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regional-B2-Chicago hot dog fds.jpg National Hot Dog and Sausage Council

Baseball fans will enjoy 18.3m hot dogs, nearly 4m sausages

Los Angeles Dodgers to stay at top of leader board, with projected sales of 2.7 million hot dogs.

When it comes to what fans eat at Major League Baseball (MLB) parks, the top dogs for well over a century have been hot dogs and sausages -- and once again, they will reign supreme in 2019. According to a survey by the National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (NHDSC), MLB fans this season are expected to consume about 18.3 million hot dogs and nearly 4 million sausages.

“It's easy to see why hot dogs and sausages have been stadium staples since the very beginnings of Major League Baseball itself,” NHDSC president Eric Mittenthal said. “They are delicious, convenient and nostalgic. What would America’s pastime be without these most American of foods?”

While it might not take the sting out of two straight World Series losses, the Los Angeles Dodgers will still top the big leagues wiener-wise, with projected sales of 2.7 million hot dogs at Dodger Stadium. America’s “Second City” is a distant runner-up, with 1.2 million hot dogs expected to be consumed at the Chicago Cubs’ home of Wrigley Field.

The Dodgers’ rivals up the coast take this year’s sausage crown as San Francisco Giants fans are expected to “polish” off 450,000 sausages, with Cubs fans not far behind at 400,000. As in past years, the Milwaukee Brewers’ Miller Park is the sole MLB venue where sausage sales will outpace hot dog sales.

While old favorites will always be on the menu, the coming season will also throw some culinary curveballs.

“In 2019, hot dogs will continue to prove their versatility at ballparks nationwide with versions that reflect our dynamic culture and changing tastes,” Mittenthal said. “It’s exciting and mouth-watering to see new takes on old classics that definitely are not your granddad’s dog!”

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