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Hearing looks to tame TPA concerns

The Senate Finance Committee held its third session in a matter of days to discuss the newly brokered Trade Promotion Authority bill introduced April 16 as well as accompanying trade policy. The latest session was the last one ahead of a planned Wednesday mark up in the committee and featured testimony from the heads of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-CIO.

Senate Finance Committee chairman Orrin Hatch (R., Utah) started off the hearing by trying to ease criticisms that the bill being debated hasn’t had adequate time for discussions, saying the concerns were “unfounded.” He said the current bill introduced has many similar provisions to the one first introduced in January 2014 and thousands of organizations have weighed in on the merits of that bill.

“The fundamentals remain the same and we’ve been transparent on what changes have been,” he said. In addition, the last Congress had nine hearings which had questions on trade and Trade Promotion Authority discussed.

Thomas Donohue, president and chief executive officer of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, explained that the 20 regions and countries the United States currently has trade agreements with represent a mere 6% of the world’s population, but buy nearly half of American’s exports. He also said when new trade agreements come into effect they have an annual average growth rate of 18% of the first five year period following an agreement coming into force.

Donohue said for American farmers and ranchers the stakes are particularly high as foreign markets place the highest tariffs on their agricultural products. “Agricultural exports have soared under new trade agreements,” he added.

Richard Trumka, president of AFL-CIO, shared the labor movement has been advocating for new trade policy for the last two decades. He challenged that offering Trade Promotion Authority to the president now allows Congress any say in the current Trans Pacific Partnership which has been negotiated for the past five years.

“This is the worst possible time to pass fast track for TPP. Any leverage you have left for those issues remaining you give away,” Trumka said.

Trumka said TPP may well be the last trade agreement that gets negotiated as new countries can actually join once the current 12 nation bloc approves it.

NPC launches PoultriMax

Nutrition Physiology Co. LLC (NPC), makers of Bovamine Defend and Bovamine Dairy, has launched PoultriMax, an exclusive probiotic applied to poultry feeds post-pelleting.

"Poultry producers in the U.S. constantly face the challenge of delivering healthy flocks and finding alternatives to using antibiotics in their production practices," said NPC president and chief executive officer Tony Arnold. "Delivering high-quality products that improve the health and productivity of animals is a priority for us. Years of research, development and testing went into creating PoultriMax and we're pleased to now be able to provide our exclusive probiotic to the poultry industry."

PoultriMax is applied — using a proprietary, cutting-edge technology — after the pelleting process has been completed to ensure the beneficial microbes remain alive at the point of consumption. Once birds are fed the probiotic, these microbes reanimate in the gastrointestinal tract where they improve digestive stability, nutrient absorption and immune function, resulting in healthier birds and increased profitability, NPC said.

Additionally, at the hatchery, PoultriMax can be mixed in water or gel and applied on day-old chicks and poults through standard spray vaccination equipment.

ADSA to update large herd resource

To benefit a broad segment of the global dairy industry, the American Dairy Science Assn. (ADSA) Foundation will undertake another major initiative, this time to meet the growing information needs of dairy farmers, service professionals and students worldwide.

In 1978, a symposium designed specifically to produce a book, Large Dairy Herd Management (LDHM), was held in Gainesville, Fla. Speakers' presentations were developed into book chapters. In 1992, the book was updated under the co-editorship of Jack Van Horn and Charlie Wilcox.

In view of continuing interest in the second edition (1992) of LDHM and requests for an update, the ADSA Foundation announced that it will undertake publication of a third edition of LDHM, which will be available in e-book or print-on-demand options with completely new content, designed to allow for convenient updating, sold at member, nonmember and student rates, and distributed directly by ADSA.

The ADSA Foundation will sponsor a conference to facilitate development of the updated third edition. The conference is tentatively planned for May 2016 in the Chicago, Ill., area. Dairy experts from around the world will be selected to prepare and make chapter presentations as a first step in creating the third edition of LDHM. Publication is anticipated for spring 2017.

Dr. David Beede will serve as conference chair and editor-in-chief of the third edition. He was an author in the second edition and is currently the C.E. Meadows endowed chair of dairy management and nutrition with the department of animal science at Michigan State University.

Nonprofit organizations, companies and individuals are invited to join the ADSA Foundation as co-sponsors of the conference, the e-book or both. For information on sponsorship, please contact Larry Miller ([email protected]).

USPOULTRY hosts webinar on waterfowl mitigation

As a further continuation of its Biosecurity Program offerings, the U.S. Poultry & Egg Assn. (USPOULTRY) will host a webinar addressing “ON-Farm Waterfowl Mitigation Practices” at 1-2:15 p.m. (EDT) on May 13. The webinar is free of charge to USPOULTRY members.

The webinar will feature Shannon Chandler, wildlife disease biologist, and Clint Turnage, wildlife disease biologist, both from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service's Wildlife Services. Both specialize in disease surveillance pertaining to avian influenza, along with other areas such as plaque and tularemia, feral swine diseases, chronic wasting disease, Escherichia coli, rabies, raccoon roundworm and canine parvovirus.

The “ON-Farm Waterfowl Mitigation Practices” webinar will discuss how producers can reduce congregations of wild birds (mainly waterfowl) on farm premises and methods that farmers can implement to help make farms unattractive to wild birds.

Participants will be able to submit questions throughout the webinar, which will be answered during a question and answer period at the end of the program. All participants will receive a copy of the recorded program and a one-page document containing important points from the webinar.

To register for the “ON-Farm Waterfowl Mitigation Practices” webinar, click here.

U.S., Canada confirm additional H5N2 cases

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service confirmed April 20 the presence of H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in additional three flocks in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa.

USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed HPAI H5N2 in the following states and counties: Juneau County, Wis. (33 mixed poultry); Kandiyohi County, Minn. (23,000 turkeys — sixth detection in this county), and Osceola County, Iowa (5.3 million chickens).

USDA noted that a seventh premises in Kandiyohi County with 9,000 turkeys was depopulated because of exposure to the sixth flock of 23,000 turkeys).

The affected premises have been quarantined the premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship noted that the Osceola operation was a commercial laying hen facility. The case is the second in Iowa and the second flock of laying hens affected in the U.S.

Southern Ontario

Meanwhile, preliminary testing by the province of Ontario has confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on a second farm in Oxford County, Ont. The farm is a broiler breeder chicken farm.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has placed the farm under quarantine to control disease spread and the poultry industry has been notified to adopt enhanced biosecurity practices. Further testing by the CFIA is underway to confirm pathogenicity and to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus. Pathogenicity refers to the severity of the illness caused in birds.

Initial tests for the disease were conducted on April 17 at the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, after the chicken farm experienced sudden deaths of birds over several days.

All birds on the infected premises will be humanely destroyed and disposed of, in accordance with provincial environmental regulations and internationally accepted disease control guidelines.

Health Canada proposes new antimicrobial measures

Health Canada announced April 17 that it intends to propose new measures and strengthen regulations to encourage prudent use of antimicrobial drugs used in food-producing animals, particularly drugs that are considered medically important.

This effort is important to minimize the global emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and conserve the effectiveness of available antimicrobials, the federal agency said. These actions will protect public health and food safety, and align with other countries.

Health Canada said it has already made "substantial progress" in working with the pharmaceutical industry to phase out all growth promotion claims of medically-important antimicrobial drugs by December 2016. In addition, Health Canada plans to:

* Propose amendments to the "Food & Drug Regulations" to address personal use importation of veterinary drugs and strengthen the control over the importation of veterinary active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and

* Continue to work with stakeholders to increase the appropriate veterinary oversight with respect to access to all medically-important antimicrobial drugs that are used in livestock drinking water and feeds. This measure will require further amendments to the "Food & Drug Regulations" and the "Feeds Regulations."

These initiatives are part of Canada's recently released Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Use in Canada, which builds on the Federal Framework for Action announced in October 2014.

The Department will continue to engage partners and stakeholders while the proposed amendments to the Food and Drug Regulations are being developed and further actions on AMR are being implemented.

In response, Chicken Farmers of Canada applauded the federal government for "taking a leadership role on the issue of antimicrobial resistance and for announcing plans to strengthen antimicrobial stewardship controls."

"Chicken Farmers of Canada supports the federal government in their objective of amending these regulations to ensure responsible antimicrobial stewardship," Chicken Farmers of Canada chair Dave Janzen said. "The chicken industry is continuing to study all facets of antibiotic use in animal agriculture to ensure that responsible, appropriate and safe use of antibiotics can continue while reduction methods are explored at all levels of the industry and with stakeholders and government partners."

The Canadian Cattlemen's Assn. (CCA) said it also supports Health Canada's plan to strengthen oversight and controls for own-use importation of veterinary drugs and the importation of APIs for veterinary use.

CCA general manager Rob McNabb commended Health Canada's Veterinarian Drug Directorate (VDD) for the consultations with industry that led to the proposed amendments. The consultations provided the forum to address misperceptions of the amount and types of products that have historically been imported through own-use importation, and VDD worked diligently with industry to clarify what veterinary products are eligible and what aren't, he said.

"Canada's beef cattle industry takes antimicrobial resistance seriously," McNabb said. "The proposed measures will further support industry's already good record of prudent and judicious use of antimicrobials as demonstrated through decades of surveillance and research."

Quick Facts

Antibiotic use in animals plays an important role in ensuring animal welfare and protecting animals and public health.

Before being authorized for sale in Canada, veterinary antibiotics are assessed by Health Canada for their potential antibiotic resistance risk.

Health Canada specifies the conditions of use of antibiotics on the product labels and includes warning statements specific to reducing AMR.

No new antibiotic growth promoters have been authorized by Health Canada in more than a decade.

Ideology main hurdle in climate debate

The U.S. Congress successfully hears the "supermajority" consensus on the reality and causes of climate change, according to scientists from Texas A&M University, Idaho State University and University of Oklahoma.

In a paper published in Climatic Change, the scientists suggest looking at business interests, partisan predispositions and political ideology for the hurdles to policy action.

"Different perceptions and claims among lawmakers are a major hurdle to agreeing on action to address global warming and these were thought to simply reflect scientific uncertainty," lead author Xinsheng Liu said. "However, our findings show that congressional testimonies are in fact consistent with agreement in the climate science community and that the sources of controversies must lie elsewhere."

Liu and co-authors Arnold Vedlitz, James Stoutenborough and Scott Robinson found that despite Republican-controlled congresses in the U.S. being more likely to feature scientists with a skeptical view, the majority of experts called as witnesses still indicate that global warming and climate change are real and caused by human activity.

They analyzed 1,350 testimonies from 253 relevant congressional hearings between 1969 and 2007. Among expert witnesses who expressed a view, 86% said global warming and climate change is happening and 78% said it is caused by human activity. Under Republican-controlled congresses, a three-quarter supermajority of scientists said it is real and anthropogenic. Most significant of all, 95% of scientists giving testimonies support action to combat it.

The near-complete agreement in the science community has been consistently presented to the U.S. Congress, the study reports. The researchers, therefore, challenge the view that simply providing more information is key to evidence-based policy making.

The findings in the study could help scientists to move past the information deficit model and shift research in new directions. This includes gaining a better understanding of how business interests, partisan predispositions, and political ideology shape the views of policymakers. Because of the economic costs, there can be strong political justification for denying the existence of global warming and climate change.

"Action on climate change requires courage to face the facts by acknowledging, incorporating and legitimizing the supermajority scientists' views on the issue while recognizing different opinions beyond science," Liu said.

Full bibliographic information: Liu, X., A. Vedlitz, J.W. Stoutenborough and S. Robinson. 2015. Scientists' Views and Positions on Global Warming and Climate Change: A Content Analysis of Congressional Testimonies. Climatic Change; DOI 10.1007/s10584-015-1390-6.

Ingredient market prices, 4/20/15

Ingredient market prices, 4/20/15

The following prices, which include delivery, were obtained April 15 from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. The prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. Second column shows the amount of change since the previous week. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used. N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available.

OILSEED PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

410.00

-

Boston

423.00

-

Buffalo

366.00

-13.00

Chicago

338.00

-2.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

420.00

-

Ft. Worth

360.00

-5.00

Kansas City

320.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

366.00

-9.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

314.00

-5.00

Okeechobee

440.00

-

Portland

369.30

-8.55

San Francisco

366.00

-9.00

Twin Falls

392.00

11.00

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

400.00

-

Boston

418.00

-

Buffalo

362.00

-13.00

Chicago

350.00

-2.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

410.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

320.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

350.00

-14.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

430.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

350.00

-4.00

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo*

205.00

-

Chicago

143.00

-

Fayetteville, NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth*

185.00

-

Los Angeles

175.00

-

Minneapolis

100.00

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

175.00

-

Twin Falls

175.00

-5.00

* unpelleted

 

 

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

283.00

-

Buffalo

320.00

-

Chicago

305.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

283.00

-

Ft. Worth

295.00

-

Los Angeles

396.00

5.00

Lubbock

280.00

-

Memphis

268.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

320.00

-

Portland

380.00

-2.50

San Francisco

396.00

5.00

Twin Falls

375.00

5.00

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

308.00

-

Chicago

343.00

-

Delmarva

308.00

-

Fayetteville NC

308.00

-

Ft. Worth

320.00

-30.00

Kansas City

335.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

285.00

-35.00

Memphis

285.00

-10.00

Okeechobee

342.00

-

San Francisco

267.00

-1.00

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

223.00

-

Chicago

215.00

-5.00

Fayetteville NC

223.00

-

Ft. Worth

160.00

5.00

Okeechobee

260.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

120.00

10.00

San Francisco

N/A

-

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

267.00

-14.00

Minneapolis

257.90

1.60

Los Angeles

281.00

-

Montreal

265.00

-

Portland

256.80

-8.05

San Francisco

281.00

-

Twin Falls

270.00

2.00

Vancouver

220.00

5.00

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

210.00

-

Minneapolis

185.00

-20.00

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

260.00

-

Fargo

240.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

276.00

-

Kansas City

265.00

-10.00

Minneapolis

240.00

-

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

175.00

2.00

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

410.00

-

Delmarva

475.00

-

Fayetteville NC

440.00

-

Ft. Worth

400.00

-

Kansas City

382.00

-3.00

Los Angeles

315.00

-

Memphis

430.00

-

Minneapolis

390.00

-

Portland

315.00

-10.00

San Francisco

315.00

-

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

460.00

-

Los Angeles

357.60

-

Memphis

450.00

-

Minneapolis

400.00

-

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

1000.00

-

Los Angeles

1000.00

25.00

Memphis

950.00

-

Minneapolis

900.00

-25.00

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

1025.00

-

Memphis

1000.00

-

Minneapolis

950.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

465.00

-

Ft. Worth

345.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

435.00

-

Memphis

465.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

550.00

-

Fayetteville NC

550.00

-

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

510.00

-

Delmarva

570.00

-

Fayetteville NC

535.00

-

Ft. Worth

620.00

-

Kansas City

640.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

510.00

-

Minneapolis

600.00

-

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1900.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1700.00

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

 

 

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

26.50

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

24.63

0.38

San Francisco

26.75

3.00

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

25.25

-1.75

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

27.00

-

Ft. Worth

25.50

1.50

Kansas City

34.00

-

Los Angeles

23.63

0.38

Memphis

27.00

-

Minneapolis

22.00

-1.00

San Francisco

22.75

-

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

26.50

-0.50

Minneapolis

24.00

-1.00

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

28.50

-1.00

Ft. Worth

27.00

-1.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

28.50

-0.50

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

26.00

1.50

Los Angeles

23.75

0.50

Minneapolis

23.75

-

San Francisco

23.75

0.50

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

24.00

-

Fayetteville NC

26.00

-

Memphis

26.00

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

32.00

-

Fayetteville NC

32.00

-

GLUTEN, HOMINY

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

663.00

-10.00

Chicago

605.00

-8.00

Kansas City

650.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

148.00

-5.00

Chicago

115.00

-5.00

Fayetteville NC

123.00

-

Kansas City

160.00

-5.00

Okeechobee

143.00

-

Twin Falls

182.00

-8.00

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

175.00

-

Boston

145.00

-

Buffalo

162.00

-1.00

Chicago

103.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

105.00

-

Los Angeles

175.00

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

175.00

-

Twin Falls

185.00

-1.00

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

155.00

-5.00

Milwaukee

150.00

-

Winona, Minn

150.00

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

235.00

-

Boston

242.00

-

Buffalo

200.00

-

Chicago

195.00

-

Fayetteville NC

235.00

-

Kansas City

125.00

-

Los Angeles

249.00

-

Minneapolis

175.00

-5.00

Okeechobee

245.00

-

Portland

239.00

1.00

San Francisco

249.00

-

Twin Falls

251.00

-

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.75

-

Milwaukee

0.75

-

Minneapolis

0.75

-

ALFALFA

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Alfalfa Center

275.00

-

Buffalo

375.00

-

Chicago

355.00

-

Kansas City

290.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

265.00

-

Toledo

385.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

220.00

-

Kansas City

225.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

287.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

 

 

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

150.00

-5.00

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

169.00

-4.00

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

160.00

-4.00

Portland

180.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

155.00

5.00

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

150.00

-10.00

Chicago

165.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

164.00

-4.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

120.00

-10.00

Chicago

120.00

-15.00

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

130.00

-15.00

Kansas City

90.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

167.00

-4.00

Memphis

135.00

-12.00

Minneapolis

85.00

-10.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

100.75

-1.38

Minneapolis

100.75

-1.38

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

92.50

-1.50

Minneapolis

92.50

-1.50

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

43.25

-

Ft. Worth

42.50

-0.50

Kansas City

54.00

-

Minneapolis

42.50

-0.50

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

94.50

-1.00

Milwaukee

94.50

-1.00

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

23.75

-

Minneapolis

23.75

-

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

514.00

-

Kansas City

430.00

-20.00

Minneapolis

490.00

-5.00

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

430.00

-

Kansas City

335.00

-

Minneapolis

431.00

-1.00

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

150.00

-

Minneapolis

138.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

75.00

-

Kansas City

65.00

-

Minneapolis

72.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

4.15

-

Minneapolis

3.14

-

Portland*

262.50

-

(*per ton)

 

 

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

130.00

-

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

135.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

176.00

1.00

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

80.00

-

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

100.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

55.00

-

Kansas City

70.00

-

DRIED PULP

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

193.00

-2.00

Fayetteville NC

203.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

173.00

-2.00

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

 

 

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

220.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

475.00

-

Minneapolis

160.00

-

Portland

230.00

-5.00

Saginaw

175.00

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls (sacked)

340.00

-

Los Angeles*

155.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

*bulk, wet

 

 

GRAINS

 

 

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City (bu.)

5.20

-0.10

Los Angeles (cwt)

8.83

-

Portland (ton)

195.00

-

San Francisco (cwt)

8.83

-1.00

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC (bu.)

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

4.80

-0.10

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

6.26

-

Boston

4.12

-

Buffalo (per ton)

158.00

-

Chicago

3.92

-0.03

Delmarva

4.13

-0.03

Fayetteville NC

5.30

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.76

-0.03

Los Angeles*

9.54

-0.23

San Fran (rail)*

9.54

-0.23

San Fran (truck)*

N/A

-

Memphis

4.02

0.01

Minneapolis

3.58

-

Okeechobee

5.53

-

Portland (per ton)

175.38

-3.38

(*per cwt)

 

 

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

4.46

-0.03

Los Angeles*

11.21

-0.14

Memphis

4.35

-0.02

*(per cwt.)

 

 

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Ft.  Worth

144.00

-1.00

Kansas City

65.00

-5.00

OTHER

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

173.00

-

San Francisco

150.00

-

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

165.00

-

Buffalo

164.00

-3.00

Fayetteville NC

175.00

-

Memphis

160.00

-

Minneapolis

170.00

-

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas City

58.00

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

150.00

-

Kansas City

195.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

195.00

-

New Orleans

150.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

 

Volume:87 Issue:15

Feedstuffs, Elanco launch VFD Central

By 2017, the growth promotion use of antibiotics approved for both humans and animals, as defined in U.S. FDA Guidances 209 and 213, will no longer be allowed. To guide all segments of animal agriculture through these regulatory changes, Feedstuffs and Elanco Animal Health have partnered to create an online resource center, VFD Central.

VFD Central is the source for Veterinary Feed Directive news, insights and updates for producers, veterinarians and feed suppliers. Provided on the site are links to the official VFD rules and regulations as being issued by the Food & Drug Administration, as well as various guidance documents on responsible antibiotic use and the latest news from the editors of Feedstuffs and industry experts.

In addition, Feedstuffs, in partnership with Elanco and the American Feed Industry Assn., plans to host several free, information-based webinars once the final VFD regulations are released. If you would like to be put on a list to receive information on these upcoming events, please send an email to [email protected] and request to be put on the invite list.

VFD Central is located at http://feedstuffs.com/vfd.aspx   

High-flying pork prices come back down to earth

According to the latest Rabobank Pork Quarterly report, the global pork industry has been searching for stability during Q1 2015, with strong supply growth and relatively weak demand driving the market.

The report said pork prices are sharply lower as robust global supply growth, driven by the U.S., Russia, and Brazil, has outpaced rather subdued demand, dragging producer profitability into negative territory. After favorable profit margins in 2014 due to PEDV losses reducing supply, hog inventory has since rebounded and global pork prices have fallen close to 40% from the historic highs of last summer, the report noted.  

"The increasing competition in the global export market will result in continuous price and margin pressure in most countries around the globe,” Rabobank animal protein analyst Albert Vernooij said. “Therefore, after the buoyant—at least price-wise—last couple of years, the global pork industry is slowly moving towards the bottom of the cycle."

Outlook for global, regional markets

As U.S. supply recovers after PEDV, Rabobank said the question is to what degree recovery will be coupled with the strengthening U.S. dollar and lower prices. “This will be crucial to the expected export recovery after the disappointing start to 2015,” the report noted.

In the EU, the report suggested that prices will follow seasonal developments, but will remain lower than the historical average and below break-even level. The  report said prospects for the EU remain meager, with higher production and lackluster demand limiting seasonal improvement of pork prices to, at best, the seasonal average.

With the industry slowly improving, prices bottomed out in China during March. The report said the main question is whether the large herd contraction of the last 18 months will return producer margins to profitability and spur increased imports.

In Brazil, prospects remain positive, but less buoyant than in Q1, driven by pressured domestic consumption and difficult Russian export negotiations, according to the report. Rabobank said it continues to believe that Brazilian pork exports will increase during 2015. However, after a weak start, the bank said the pace of growth might not be sufficient to surpass 10%, as previously predicted.