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Articles from 2016 In March


Ingredient market prices, 3/30/16

The following prices, which include delivery, were obtained March 30 from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. The prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. Second column shows the amount of change since the previous week. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used.
N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available.

OILSEED PRODUCTS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

373.00

2.00

Boston

307.00

9.00

Buffalo

318.00

1.00

Chicago

282.00

1.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

383.00

2.00

Ft. Worth

313.00

-8.00

Kansas City

270.00

-

Los Angeles

316.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

257.40

-7.60

Okeechobee

373.00

2.00

Portland

322.60

-0.90

San Francisco

316.00

-

Twin Falls

324.00

-6.00

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

363.00

2.00

Boston

302.00

9.00

Buffalo

314.00

1.00

Chicago

270.00

1.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

373.00

2.00

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

270.00

-

Los Angeles

297.00

1.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

363.00

2.00

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

297.00

1.00

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

155.00

-

Buffalo*

150.00

-10.00

Chicago

105.00

-8.00

Fayetteville, NC

175.00

-

Ft. Worth*

160.00

-

Los Angeles

150.00

5.00

Minneapolis

90.00

-

Okeechobee

155.00

-

San Francisco

150.00

5.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

* unpelleted

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

240.00

-

Buffalo

283.00

-

Chicago

283.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

240.00

-

Ft. Worth

265.00

-10.00

Los Angeles

320.00

-

Lubbock

230.00

-5.00

Memphis

248.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

257.00

-

Portland

325.00

-2.50

San Francisco

320.00

-10.00

Twin Falls

315.00

5.00

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

250.00

-

Chicago

243.00

-5.00

Delmarva

250.00

-

Fayetteville NC

250.00

-

Ft. Worth

250.00

-15.00

Kansas City

255.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

215.00

-15.00

Memphis

215.00

-

Okeechobee

260.00

-

San Francisco

243.00

-2.00

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

240.00

-

Chicago

280.00

-

Fayetteville NC

240.00

-

Ft. Worth

150.00

-45.00

Okeechobee

277.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

120.00

-20.00

San Francisco

270.00

-

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

244.00

11.00

Minneapolis

211.90

14.20

Los Angeles

242.00

-4.00

Montreal

234.00

6.00

Portland

235.10

3.60

San Francisco

242.00

-4.00

Twin Falls

245.00

-5.00

Vancouver

190.00

-5.00

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

120.00

-

Minneapolis

120.00

-

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

235.00

5.00

Fargo

200.00

10.00

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

236.00

10.00

Kansas City

220.00

10.00

Minneapolis

210.00

5.00

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

142.00

11.00

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

335.00

20.00

Delmarva

395.00

10.00

Fayetteville NC

350.00

10.00

Ft. Worth

330.00

10.00

Kansas City

275.00

-

Los Angeles

250.00

15.00

Memphis

340.00

10.00

Minneapolis

300.00

15.00

Portland

275.00

45.00

San Francisco

250.00

15.00

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

430.00

40.00

Los Angeles

290.00

15.60

Memphis

420.00

50.00

Minneapolis

350.00

10.00

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

825.00

-

Los Angeles

875.00

-

Memphis

800.00

-

Minneapolis

775.00

-25.00

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

875.00

-

Memphis

850.00

-

Minneapolis

850.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

300.00

-

Ft. Worth

230.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

357.00

18.00

Memphis

300.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

550.00

25.00

Fayetteville NC

550.00

25.00

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

330.00

30.00

Delmarva

355.00

10.00

Fayetteville NC

330.00

30.00

Ft. Worth

422.50

82.50

Kansas City

455.00

105.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

330.00

30.00

Minneapolis

350.00

-

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1550.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1350.00

-

Minneapolis

1610.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

21.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

24.25

0.13

San Francisco

23.50

-

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

20.50

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

23.00

1.00

Ft. Worth

27.00

-

Kansas City

25.50

-

Los Angeles

23.25

0.13

Memphis

23.00

1.00

Minneapolis

24.00

1.00

San Francisco

22.50

-

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

21.25

-

Minneapolis

27.00

1.00

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

24.00

-

Ft. Worth

32.00

3.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

32.00

1.00

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

27.50

-

Los Angeles

22.63

0.25

Minneapolis

25.50

0.50

San Francisco

22.63

0.25

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

25.50

0.50

Fayetteville NC

25.00

2.00

Memphis

25.00

2.00

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

32.00

2.00

Fayetteville NC

32.00

2.00

GLUTEN, HOMINY

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

530.00

-12.00

Chicago

455.00

-

Kansas City

505.00

-

Los Angeles

525.00

-

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

153.00

-

Chicago

92.00

-3.00

Fayetteville NC

110.00

-

Kansas City

135.00

-

Okeechobee

130.00

-

Twin Falls

170.00

3.00

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

155.00

-

Boston

127.00

-3.00

Buffalo

168.00

-2.00

Chicago

93.00

-5.00

Fayetteville NC

155.00

-

Kansas City

107.00

-

Los Angeles

167.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

167.00

-2.00

Twin Falls

171.00

-

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

150.00

-

Milwaukee

140.00

-

Winona, Minn

140.00

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

180.00

-10.00

Boston

148.00

-9.00

Buffalo

140.00

-10.00

Chicago

128.00

-2.00

Fayetteville NC

180.00

-10.00

Kansas City

113.00

-

Los Angeles

180.00

-

Minneapolis

110.00

-5.00

Okeechobee

190.00

-10.00

Portland

184.00

-1.00

San Francisco

180.00

-

Twin Falls

177.00

-6.00

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.75

-

Milwaukee

0.75

-

Minneapolis

0.75

-

ALFALFA

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Central Nebraska

250.00

-

Buffalo

375.00

-

Chicago

340.00

-

Kansas City

275.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

245.00

-

Toledo

330.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

195.00

-

Kansas City

193.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

255.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

130.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

128.00

1.00

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

119.00

1.00

Portland

145.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

120.00

8.00

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

121.00

-10.00

Chicago

125.00

-

Los Angeles

123.00

1.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

88.00

-10.00

Chicago

100.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

105.00

5.00

Kansas City

60.00

-

Los Angeles

126.00

1.00

Memphis

112.00

2.00

Minneapolis

68.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

77.50

-

Minneapolis

77.50

-

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

76.63

-0.63

Minneapolis

76.63

-0.63

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

24.25

-

Ft. Worth

24.13

-0.13

Kansas City

52.00

-

Minneapolis

24.13

-0.13

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

61.00

3.00

Milwaukee

61.00

3.00

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

23.25

0.25

Minneapolis

23.25

0.25

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

435.00

-

Kansas City

330.00

-

Minneapolis

446.00

-

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

400.00

-

Kansas City

275.00

-

Minneapolis

410.00

-

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

130.00

-

Minneapolis

138.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

65.00

-

Kansas City

40.00

-

Minneapolis

72.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

2.95

-

Minneapolis

2.60

-

Portland*

250.00

-

(*per ton)

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

135.00

-

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

150.00

-5.00

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

111.00

2.00

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

88.00

-2.00

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

110.00

-5.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

62.00

4.00

Kansas City

70.00

-

DRIED PULP

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

185.00

-

Fayetteville NC

195.00

-

Okeechobee

160.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

185.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

430.00

-

Minneapolis

130.00

-

Portland

168.00

-

Saginaw

150.00

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls (sacked)

340.00

-

Los Angeles*

108.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

*bulk, wet

GRAINS

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City (bu.)

3.80

-

Los Angeles (cwt)

10.05

-0.05

Portland (ton)

180.00

-

San Francisco (cwt)

10.05

-0.05

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC (bu.)

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

4.92

0.07

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

5.34

-0.02

Boston

3.71

-0.15

Buffalo (per ton)

153.00

-2.00

Chicago

3.85

-0.01

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

5.34

-0.02

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.66

-

Los Angeles*

9.06

0.09

San Fran (rail)*

9.06

0.09

San Fran (truck)*

N/A

-

Memphis

3.77

-0.06

Minneapolis

3.08

-

Okeechobee

5.57

-0.02

Portland (per ton)

168.88

1.00

(*per cwt)

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.36

-

Los Angeles*

8.95

0.12

Memphis

N/A

-

*(per cwt.)

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Ft.  Worth

430.00

-9.00

Kansas City

50.00

-

OTHER

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

77.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

180.00

-

Buffalo

152.00

-

Fayetteville NC

185.00

-

Memphis

175.00

-

Minneapolis

163.00

-

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas City

58.00

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

142.50

-

Kansas City

177.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

182.50

-

New Orleans

142.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Ingredient market prices, April 2016 monthly summary

Ingredient market prices, April 2016 monthly summary

The following prices include delivery are were obtained from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. Prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. The first column is the average for four weeks of March. The second column shows the change from the previous month's average. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used. N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available.

OILSEED PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

366.75

-1.00

Boston

299.00

-9.25

Buffalo

319.00

12.75

Chicago

278.75

3.25

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

376.75

-1.00

Ft. Worth

319.00

2.50

Kansas City

267.50

1.25

Los Angeles

316.25

1.25

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

259.78

4.07

Okeechobee

366.75

-1.00

Portland

321.69

-1.27

San Francisco

316.25

1.25

Twin Falls

327.75

3.00

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

356.75

-1.00

Boston

294.00

-9.25

Buffalo

315.00

12.75

Chicago

266.75

3.25

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

366.75

-1.00

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

267.50

1.25

Los Angeles

293.50

-6.75

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

356.75

-1.00

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

293.50

-6.75

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

152.50

-47.50

Buffalo*

157.50

-2.50

Chicago

118.50

-2.25

Fayetteville, NC

172.50

-47.50

Ft. Worth*

160.00

-2.25

Los Angeles

151.25

5.00

Minneapolis

91.25

6.25

Okeechobee

152.50

-47.50

San Francisco

151.25

5.00

Twin Falls

289.00

-62.00

* unpelleted

 

 

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

244.50

-10.50

Buffalo

286.00

-12.00

Chicago

288.75

-4.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

244.50

-10.50

Ft. Worth

275.00

-12.50

Los Angeles

334.00

-14.00

Lubbock

236.25

-18.75

Memphis

250.75

-6.75

Okeechobee

261.50

-10.50

Portland

333.75

-35.75

San Francisco

336.50

-11.50

Twin Falls

316.25

-26.25

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

257.50

-7.50

Chicago

256.75

-18.00

Delmarva

257.50

-7.50

Fayetteville NC

257.50

-7.50

Ft. Worth

268.75

-16.25

Kansas City

263.75

-17.25

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

235.00

-20.00

Memphis

218.75

-17.50

Okeechobee

267.50

-7.50

San Francisco

244.00

-16.50

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

247.50

-62.50

Chicago

280.00

-

Fayetteville NC

247.50

-62.50

Ft. Worth

193.75

-1.25

Okeechobee

284.50

-62.50

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

145.00

-20.00

San Francisco

270.00

-10.00

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

230.75

-5.25

Minneapolis

199.05

3.40

Los Angeles

236.00

1.75

Montreal

221.25

6.75

Portland

227.31

3.07

San Francisco

236.00

1.75

Twin Falls

263.50

-64.25

Vancouver

191.25

3.75

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

120.00

-11.25

Minneapolis

120.00

-5.00

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

230.00

3.75

Fargo

187.50

-2.50

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

223.50

-2.50

Kansas City

212.50

-11.25

Minneapolis

205.00

-

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

132.00

-14.00

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

289.50

68.75

Delmarva

361.25

71.25

Fayetteville NC

352.50

110.00

Ft. Worth

282.50

85.00

Kansas City

257.50

63.75

Los Angeles

235.00

10.00

Memphis

312.50

80.00

Minneapolis

257.50

53.75

Portland

213.75

16.25

San Francisco

235.00

10.00

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

360.00

122.50

Los Angeles

274.40

10.40

Memphis

347.50

120.00

Minneapolis

305.00

82.50

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

862.50

87.50

Los Angeles

918.75

80.75

Memphis

837.50

87.50

Minneapolis

818.75

43.75

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

912.50

100.00

Memphis

887.50

100.00

Minneapolis

862.50

32.50

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

275.00

-

Fayetteville NC

270.00

35.00

Ft. Worth

225.00

20.00

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

339.00

13.50

Memphis

270.00

35.00

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

486.25

36.25

Fayetteville NC

486.25

36.25

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

265.00

52.50

Delmarva

299.38

59.38

Fayetteville NC

265.00

52.50

Ft. Worth

315.00

67.50

Kansas City

330.00

45.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

290.00

77.50

Minneapolis

307.50

13.75

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1,550.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1,350.00

-62.50

Minneapolis

1,610.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

 

 

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

21.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

22.75

0.91

San Francisco

21.96

1.43

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

20.50

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

21.25

0.25

Ft. Worth

25.75

2.75

Kansas City

25.50

-0.50

Los Angeles

21.75

0.91

Memphis

21.25

0.25

Minneapolis

21.75

2.00

San Francisco

21.35

1.81

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

21.44

-0.44

Minneapolis

24.00

2.75

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

22.88

-

Ft. Worth

28.50

1.50

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

29.00

3.25

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

26.50

3.25

Los Angeles

21.74

2.80

Minneapolis

23.38

2.13

San Francisco

21.74

2.80

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

23.50

1.50

Fayetteville NC

21.75

1.75

Memphis

21.75

1.75

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

28.75

1.75

Fayetteville NC

28.75

1.75

GLUTEN, HOMINY

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

542.00

-4.75

Chicago

461.75

-9.50

Kansas City

507.50

-7.75

Los Angeles

527.50

-6.25

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

157.25

-4.25

Chicago

100.00

-15.00

Fayetteville NC

125.00

-12.50

Kansas City

143.75

-6.25

Okeechobee

145.00

-12.50

Twin Falls

188.67

-13.00

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

156.25

-7.50

Boston

130.00

-6.50

Buffalo

175.25

-5.00

Chicago

99.25

-6.75

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

107.00

-2.25

Los Angeles

170.25

-1.50

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

170.25

-1.50

Twin Falls

178.00

-0.75

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

150.00

-

Milwaukee

140.00

-

Winona, Minn

140.00

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

190.00

-

Boston

158.50

-4.50

Buffalo

150.25

-7.25

Chicago

136.25

-3.75

Fayetteville NC

190.00

-

Kansas City

113.00

-0.50

Los Angeles

184.00

-6.75

Minneapolis

117.50

0.63

Okeechobee

200.00

-

Portland

185.50

0.13

San Francisco

184.00

-6.75

Twin Falls

189.75

-4.00

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.75

-

Milwaukee

0.75

-

Minneapolis

0.75

-

ALFALFA

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Central Nebraska

250.00

-

Buffalo

375.00

-

Chicago

340.00

-

Kansas City

272.50

2.50

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

245.00

-

Toledo

330.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

193.75

-1.25

Kansas City

193.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

255.00

-11.25

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

 

 

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

130.00

-3.75

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

126.25

-4.25

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

117.25

-4.25

Portland

153.75

-16.25

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

126.75

-8.25

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

128.25

2.75

Chicago

132.50

-2.50

Los Angeles

121.25

-6.75

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

95.25

1.25

Chicago

106.00

-7.25

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

120.00

-31.25

Kansas City

77.50

-23.75

Los Angeles

124.25

-4.25

Memphis

120.50

-21.50

Minneapolis

72.75

-7.25

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

77.88

-0.75

Minneapolis

77.88

-0.75

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

77.56

-2.25

Minneapolis

77.56

-2.25

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

24.13

0.38

Ft. Worth

24.19

0.25

Kansas City

52.00

-0.25

Minneapolis

24.19

0.25

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

58.00

0.38

Milwaukee

58.00

0.38

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

22.75

1.13

Minneapolis

22.75

1.08

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

435.00

-3.75

Kansas City

342.50

-8.75

Minneapolis

446.00

-1.50

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

400.00

-

Kansas City

278.75

-1.25

Minneapolis

410.00

-

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

137.50

-2.50

Minneapolis

138.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

68.75

-1.25

Kansas City

40.00

-2.50

Minneapolis

72.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

2.86

0.21

Minneapolis

2.60

-

Portland*

250.00

-

(*per ton)

 

 

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

141.25

-25.00

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

157.50

-8.75

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

109.75

0.75

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

92.50

-7.50

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

117.50

-8.75

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

58.50

-5.25

Kansas City

72.50

-5.00

DRIED PULP

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

183.75

-5.00

Fayetteville NC

193.75

-5.00

Okeechobee

161.25

1.25

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

 

 

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

185.00

-18.75

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

430.00

-

Minneapolis

130.00

-

Portland

168.00

-

Saginaw

150.00

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls (sacked)

340.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

135.00

-30.00

*bulk, wet

 

 

GRAINS

 

 

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City (bu.)

3.93

-0.18

Los Angeles (cwt)

10.17

-0.10

Portland (ton)

179.38

-4.38

San Francisco (cwt)

10.17

-0.10

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC (bu.)

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

4.86

-0.06

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

5.32

-0.06

Boston

3.89

-0.15

Buffalo (per ton)

153.00

-

Chicago

3.78

-0.04

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

5.32

-0.05

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.60

-0.09

Los Angeles*

8.91

-0.18

San Fran (rail)*

8.91

-0.18

San Fran (truck)*

N/A

-

Memphis

3.77

0.01

Minneapolis

3.08

-0.10

Okeechobee

5.55

-0.06

Portland (per ton)

165.97

-0.34

(*per cwt)

 

 

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.31

-0.81

Los Angeles*

8.80

-0.19

Memphis

N/A

-

*(per cwt.)

 

 

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Ft.  Worth

438.50

-2.75

Kansas City

50.00

-

OTHER

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

79.75

-10.50

San Francisco

50.00

-6.25

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

180.00

10.00

Buffalo

152.00

-3.75

Fayetteville NC

185.00

10.00

Memphis

175.00

10.00

Minneapolis

161.00

1.00

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas City

58.00

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

142.50

-

Kansas City

177.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

182.50

-

New Orleans

142.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

 

Volume:88 Issue:04

USDA looks to resuscitate GIPSA rule

USDA looks to resuscitate GIPSA rule

FOR years, the appropriations process has included a rider to defund the Grain Inspection, Packers & Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) from finalizing several rules under the Packers & Stockyard Act. With the rider no longer in force, however, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said he hopes to finalize the rules by the end of the year.

The 2008 farm bill called for provisions that would help level the playing field and prevent anticompetitive practices. In 2010, GIPSA proposed a set of rules along this line. In late 2011, GIPSA finalized some of the rules but was prevented from finalizing others by a legislative rider included in the fiscal 2012 agricultural appropriations bill.

Vilsack, during questioning recently before the Senate appropriations agriculture subcommittee, said he has directed his team to determine what modifications may be appropriate, given concerns in the past, and to resume finalizing the rule.

When removing the rider in 2014, a group of senators had called it "anti-farmer" and said the rider prevented GIPSA from completing its task of writing commonsense "rules of the road for the contract livestock and poultry production industry."

Vilsack said the rule is necessary to level the playing field — especially between owners of the animals and producers — where there is an unfair advantage.

He noted that the avian influenza situation in 2015 brought to light the type of relationships that exist between owners and growers in the poultry industry and served as an example of how producers who have to deal with difficult circumstances may not be provided "fair and equitable" compensation.

Vilsack said he plans to finalize rules and send them to the Office of Management & Budget (OMB) for review by early spring.

Ed Avalos, USDA undersecretary for marketing and regulatory programs, said that rule is in much earlier stages than previously indicated as the agency is just starting to work on internal discussions and is beginning to examine the many comments received on the rule.

Avalos said USDA still needs to determine a work plan, compile the rule and send it to OMB for final review. The OMB stage can take 90 days or longer. "The earliest this could be out for public comment is summer to early fall," he said.

Volume:88 Issue:04

LIVESTOCK MARKETS: South American beef to increase global presence

LIVESTOCK MARKETS: South American beef to increase global presence

South America's beef exporters are set to increase exports by an estimated 11% in 2016 (Figure), supported by favorable currency values, improved access to importing countries and increased availability of beef, according to Rabobank's newly released “Beef Quarterly Q1 2016” report.

“While Brazilian consumers are seeing their purchasing power decline, local beef prices remain high,” the report notes.

On the supply side, Rabobank said high calf prices — driven by low calf availability — have encouraged cattle producers to keep cows rather than cull them. The country's weaker currency has also made Brazilian beef very competitive on international markets, and strong global demand has pushed local market prices higher. The resulting high domestic beef prices have pushed consumers towards cheaper competing proteins, such as poultry, freeing up additional beef for exports, Rabobank noted.

The report also notes that Brazil will likely secure access to the U.S. fresh beef market in mid-2016. Brazilian authorities have said the first shipment should occur in the first half of 2016.

“Accessing the U.S. beef market would improve Brazil's position in the international market, as many other countries use access to the U.S. market as a basis for enabling access to their own market,” the bank explained, adding that Argentina experienced this when it gained access to the Canadian market on the basis of trade negotiations with the U.S.

Argentina's new President Mauricio Macri recently removed a 15% tariff on beef exports, which will also spur increased exports in Argentina, the report notes. Rabobank forecasted beef exports to total around 300,000 metric tons, a 30% increase from 2015.

“Production is expected to take at least two years to rebound due to the need to rebuild the herd, which looks likely now that producers feel optimistic about their activities,” the bank said.

For other regions, the report shows that, despite a slowing economy, China's official imports of beef continue to increase and, in fact, surged by 60% year over year in 2015, reaching 473,000 mt. According to the report, the additional volume comes from Brazil, Argentina and New Zealand, where weaker currencies have been a driving force to supplying beef at more competitive prices.

Since 2013, China has expanded the list of countries from which it imports, and this will continue in 2016, Rabobank suggested.

“It is expected that China will open the market to more countries in 2016 to assist in lowering the beef price in local markets to a more affordable level,” the report notes, adding that China is also expected to import more from South America this year.

Rabobank said supplies in Australia are drying up as beef production in the country is expected to remain low in the first half of 2016.

“The contraction in beef production and exports has continued into 2016 and is not expected to show any real improvement in the coming months. Meat processing plants that closed for the Christmas period have either not opened or reopened, but with reduced capacity to accommodate ongoing lower supplies,” the report says.

Australian beef production was down 18% year over year in January, at 149,533 mt. February exports were 14% lower than in 2015, but “while below 2014 and 2015 levels, they are 12% higher than 2012 levels,” the report adds.

In the U.S., Rabobank said the 2016 market is one of two separate stories.

Lower feedlot placement numbers since August 2015 have cause tight supplies of fed cattle. On the other hand, however, the combination of two years of rebuilding the cow herd plus the buildup of supplies has resulted in a larger supply of available feeder cattle outside feedyards.

“The combined effects of a modest improvement in fed cattle prices, lower prices for feeder cattle and calves plus the expectation of low feed grain prices lead to the expectation for placements to increase substantially over the next several months,” the Rabobank noted, adding that this will, in turn, increase fed cattle supplies for the second half of the year.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Outlook forecasted in February that U.S. imports of beef and veal will drop in 2016 by 24% to 900,000 mt.

“Their forecast is based on very strong imports in 2015, which have led to record-high cold storage stocks, as well as recovery in the U.S. herd and increased production, which will dampen demand for imported beef in the 2016 fiscal year,” the Rabobank report says.

Market recap

Cattle markets were mostly lower this week until USDA released its “Prospective Plantings” report revealing that farmers plan to plant a lot more corn than had been anticipated. April live cattle future markets closed lower Monday at $135.10/cwt. and continued to fall through Wednesday to $132.35/cwt. The USDA report provided a boost Thursday afternoon, and nearby contracts closed higher at $132.925/cwt.

March feeder cattle futures closed lower Monday at $155.757/cwt. While they posted gains Tuesday, they plunged Wednesday to close at $152.575/cwt. However, markets rallied to close higher Thursday at $157.075/cwt. following news that more corn is on tap for the 2016-17 growing season.

For the beef cutouts this week, Choice closed lower than the prior week at $220.99/cwt., and Select closed about 7 cents lower than the previous week at $210.48/cwt.

April lean hog futures started the week strong, closing higher Monday and Tuesday at $69.925/cwt. and $70.25/cwt., respectively. The markets were unable to sustain the gains and fell to close lower Thursday at $68.35/cwt.

Pork cutout values were mostly lower this week. The wholesale pork cutout finished lower Thursday at $76.05/cwt. but was higher than the previous week. Loins and hams closed lower at $78.06/cwt. and $52.63/cwt., respectively, but were also higher than the previous week’s prices. Bellies closed lower at $126.17/cwt. and were lower than the week before.

Hogs delivered to the western Corn Belt were higher this week, closing at $62.88/cwt. on Thursday.

In the poultry markets, the Georgia dock was unchanged Wednesday at $1.115/lb. Breast meat and leg quarters were slightly lower at $1.41/lb. and 31.5 cents/lb., respectively. Wings were up a few cents to $1.64/lb.

According to USDA, egg prices have been steady, with a weak to sharply lower undertone. Offerings have been moderate to heavy. Demand has ranged from light to fairly good, USDA said. Supplies vary by area: moderate to heavy in the Midwest and Northeast, light to heavy in California and moderate in the Southeast regions.

Large eggs delivered to the Northeast were lower than the previous week at 89-93 cents/doz. Prices in the Southeast and Midwest were also lower at 92-95 cents/doz. and 89-91 cents/doz., respectively. Large eggs delivered to California were about 20 cents lower at $1.45/doz.

USDA said the turkey markets were steady to, in some instances, firm. Offerings were light to moderate, with light to sometimes moderate demand. Prices for hens and toms both increased 1 cent on the lower end of the range to $1.12-1.18/lb. and $1.12-1.38/lb., respectively.

FAS opens new market opportunities for U.S. dairy cattle in Pakistan

FAS opens new market opportunities for U.S. dairy cattle in Pakistan

U.S. dairy cows are back in Pakistan for the first time in 17 years. More than 300 heifers arrived in Punjab province on March 2, thanks to the efforts of U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). It hopes the shipment will be the first of many from the U.S. and will provide a better breed of cow for the rapidly growing Pakistani dairy industry.

Most of the dairy cows have been purchased by commercial dairy farms, but 73 Holsteins in the shipment will be delivered to a new model dairy farm established by FAS to support the growing Pakistani dairy industry and create new opportunities for U.S. exporters.

The first U.S. dairy cattle shipped to Pakistan in 17 years are loaded onto trucks for their journey to the FAS-supported demonstration farm at the University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences near Lahore. Source: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service

“Pakistan is among the world’s largest dairy producers and is a great opportunity for U.S. exporters,” FAS noted. “Most Pakistani dairy production comes from small, traditional farms, but modern, commercial dairies are starting to come on line, as are high-yield livestock management practices.”

Pakistan’s adoption of intensive production practices is expected to be a good fit for higher-producing American breeds, the agency said. “Similarly, additional training in herd management and health practices will enable herd managers to make the most of the genetic potential of U.S. cows,” FAS noted.

With this in mind, FAS collaborated with Pakistan’s University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences (UVAS) near Lahore to establish the model dairy farm with funding support from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Pattoki Training & Research Demonstration Farm will train Pakistani students, herd managers and extension agents, demonstrating the benefits of American dairy cows and ultimately helping generate demand for additional exports of U.S. cattle and genetics to Pakistan. FAS is working with Mississippi State University to teach better herd management to UVAS staff and faculty in order to help their Holsteins thrive in Pakistan’s warm climate.

Pakistan closed its market to imports of U.S. live cattle in 2003 because of concerns about bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Work by FAS and USDA’s Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service led to the reopening of the market in 2015 after the U.S. received classification by the World Organization for Animal Health as a negligible-risk country for BSE.

ADM reaches agreement to sell Brazilian sugar ethanol operations

Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) announced March 31 that it has reached an agreement to sell its sugarcane ethanol operations in Limeira do Oeste, in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, to JFLim Participações S.A.

“We regularly review our asset portfolio to determine how best to maximize shareholder returns, and in this case, we have determined that our sugarcane ethanol operations in Brazil are unlikely to meet our long-term returns objectives,” said Chris Cuddy, president of ADM’s corn processing business unit. “As our sole sugarcane ethanol operation in Brazil, this asset is too small for ADM to compete effectively in a challenging ethanol environment.”

The transaction includes a sugarcane plantation and an ethanol distillery that is capable of crushing up to 1.5 million tons of sugarcane and producing 37,000 gal. of ethanol per year. About 650 employees work in the plantation and plant.

The sale, which is subject to regulatory review, is expected to close in the second quarter of this year.

“ADM is continuing to invest in Brazil, which is a major center for our global operations,” Cuddy continued. “Brazil is one of the world’s most important producers of agricultural products and will be critical to feeding a growing global population in the coming years. We look forward to continuing to partner with Brazilian farmers to feed the world together.”

ADM is one of the largest agribusiness companies in Brazil. With about 3,900 employees, ADM processes soybeans in five facilities and sunflower at another and markets the bottled oil brands Concórdia, Corcovado and Vitaliv. The company also operates the largest biodiesel plant in Brazil and more than 40 elevators across the country. ADM is a joint owner of an export terminal in Barcarena and has a concession to operate a terminal at the Port of Santos. It is also building a soy protein production complex next to its existing soybean plant in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul.

Livestock & poultry cash market comparisons, 3/30/16

Livestock and meat ($)

March 30

March 23

6 mos. ago

Year ago

Steers, Choice, carcass, 550-700 lb., cwt., Omaha

221.87

226.18

208.62

255.42

Steers, Choice, 1,050-1,200 lb., cwt. Southern Plains

136.00

139.00

130.00A

165.00

Feeder Steers, 600-700 lb., cwt., Oklahoma City

177.75A

177.25A

200.25A

247.62A

Lean Hogs, Carcass, Iowa-Minn. 167-187 lb.(1)

64.80

64.45

70.37

59.49

Feeder Pigs, 40 lb. National Direct Delivered(2)

83.26

79.01

43.23

65.61

SEW Pigs, 10 lb., National direct delivered (per head)

40.65

42.66

31.32

32.46

Choice Beef, cutout, cwt.

220.99

224.84

207.55

255.94

Pork Loin, 185 lb. 51-52% lean, cutout, cwt.(3)

78.06

77.13

85.93

80.84

Hog Corn Ratio

17.81

17.51

19.66

14.78

Steer Corn Ratio

37.67

39.38

33.24

43.14

Poultry and eggs (cents)

 

 

 

 

Chickens, Grade A, Fresh lb. Chicago

80.16a

82.52a

73.24a

97.67a

Hen Turkeys, Grade A, Frozen, lb., Chicago

115.00Aa

114.50Aa

135.00Aa

103.50Aa

Young Tom Turkeys, Grade A. Frozen lb. Chicago

125.00Aa

124.50Aa

136.00Aa

103.50Aa

Eggs, Grade A, Large, doz., Chicago

86.50

94.50

201.50

168.50

N/A: not available

 

 

 

 

(1) Replaces live hogs; live hogs are 0.755 of quote.
(2) Replaces Sioux Falls, 50-60 lbs. (2/26/07)
(3) National FOB plant, replaces national daily carlot.
Livestock, meat, poultry and egg prices from USDA.

Environmental groups sue over FDA's approval of GE salmon

A broad coalition of environmental, consumer and commercial and recreational fishing organizations sued the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for approving the first-ever genetically engineered (GE) food animal: an Atlantic salmon engineered to grow quickly.

The manmade salmon was created by AquaBounty Technologies Inc. with DNA from three fish: Atlantic salmon, Pacific king salmon and Arctic ocean eelpout. This marks the first time any government in the world has approved a GE animal for commercial sale and consumption.

The plaintiff coalition, jointly represented by legal counsel from the Center for Food Safety and Earthjustice, includes the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations, Institute for Fisheries Resources, Golden Gate Salmon Assn., Kennebec Reborn, Friends of Merrymeeting Bay, Ecology Action Centre, Food & Water Watch, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth, Cascadia Wildlands and Center for Food Safety.

“FDA has not answered crucial questions about the environmental risks posed by these fish or what can happen when these fish escape,” said Earthjustice attorney Brettny Hardy, co-counsel for the plaintiffs. “We need these answers now, and the FDA must be held to a higher standard. We are talking about the mass production of a highly migratory GE fish that could threaten some of the last remaining wild salmon on the planet. This isn't the time to skimp on analysis and simply hope for the best.”

The lawsuit challenges FDA's claim that it has authority to approve and regulate GE animals as “animal drugs” under the 1938 Federal Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act. The groups claim that these provisions were meant to ensure the safety of veterinary drugs administered to treat disease in livestock and were not intended to address entirely new GE animals that can pass along their altered genes to the next generation.

The approval of the GE salmon opens the door to other genetically engineered fish and shellfish, as well as chickens, cows, sheep, goats, rabbits and pigs that are reportedly in development, they said.

The lawsuit also highlights what the plaintiffs claim is FDA's failure to protect the environment and consult wildlife agencies in its review process, as required by federal law.

U.S. Atlantic salmon — and many populations of Pacific salmon — are protected by the Endangered Species Act and are in danger of extinction. The groups contend that studies have shown that there is a high risk for GE organisms to escape into the natural environment and that GE salmon can crossbreed with native fish. Transgenic contamination has become common in the GE plant context, where contamination episodes have cost U.S. farmers billions of dollars over the past decade.

“FDA's decision is as unlawful as it is irresponsible,” said George Kimbrell, senior attorney for the Center for Food Safety and co-counsel for the plaintiffs. “This case is about protecting our fisheries and ocean ecosystems from the foreseeable harms of the first-ever GE fish — harms FDA refused to even consider, let alone prevent — but it's also about the future of our food: FDA should not, and cannot, responsibly regulate this GE animal, nor any future GE animals, by treating them as drugs under a 1938 law.”

Inside Washington: Time to fix internet sales tax

Now is the time for Congress to move legislation that would provide clarity, uniformity and parity to U.S. merchants by allowing states to collect existing sales and use taxes on remote purchases, the American Farm Bureau Federation and 25 other organizations told House Judiciary Committee chairman Robert Goodlatte (R., Va.) in a recent letter.

Businesses in small and rural towns provide essential goods and services to the local farmers and ranchers, but hometown businesses are at a disadvantage when they compete with online-only retailers, which don't have to collect sales taxes. When this disadvantage causes a "Main Street" business to close or scale back, already struggling rural towns are particularly hurt.

It's not only local merchants that feel the pinch of internet sales. Online-only sales deprive state and local governments of the tax revenue they need to provide essential services. Since local governments and schools rely heavily on property taxes for funding, when sales tax revenues decline, property taxes are often increased to make up the difference, which is very burdensome for land-based businesses like farms and ranches.

According to Farm Bureau and the other organizations, the House Judiciary Committee should consider two approaches to this critical issue: the Remote Transactions Parity Act (H.R. 2775), or the similar, soon-to-be-introduced Online Sales & Simplification Act.

"We believe Congress should exercise its right and responsibility to oversee matters of interstate commerce. As you are aware, because Congress has not passed remote sales tax legislation, numerous states have enacted or are considering varied approaches to collecting these current tax obligations," the groups wrote.

In the absence of congressional action, states feel compelled to seek disjointed and confusing remedies, which could very well result in the internet sales tax issue being decided by the courts. "Further, this state-by-state approach prevents businesses from benefitting from simplification measures such as uniform definitions or free tax software that could be achieved by federal legislation," the groups pointed out.

In addition to the current and soon-to-be-introduced measures in the House, the Marketplace Fairness Act (S. 698) is pending in the Senate. The bill would enable states to apply sales tax laws across the board. It allows states to enforce their existing sales tax laws but does not create new taxes or increase existing ones.

Grain & ingredient cash market comparisons, 3/30/16

Major feed ingredients

March 30

March 23

6 mos. ago

Year ago

Corn No. 2, Chicago, bu.

 

 

 

 

Processor bid*

3.72A

3.75A

3.91A

3.83A

Terminal bid*

3.57A

3.59A

3.69A

3.73A

Milo, Kansas City, cwt.

6.00

6.00

6.37

8.05

Soybeans, Chicago, bu., processor bid

9.05A

8.97A

8.86A

9.81A

Soybean Meal, 48% Decatur Bid

278.40A

277.40A

330.80A

357.40A

Cottonseed Meal, Memphis, ton

215.00

215.00

290.00

295.00

Canola meal, Minneapolis, ton

211.90

197.70

256.50

262.90

Linseed Meal, Solvent, Minneapolis

210.00

205.00

215.00

230.00

Meat and Bone Meal, Chicago, ton

335.00

315.00

320.00

410.00

Fish Meal, Menhaden, Atlanta, ton

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Corn Gluten Meal, 60%, Chicago, ton

455.00

455.00

535.00

608.00

Distillers Dried Grains, Chicago, ton

128.00

130.00

125.00

200.00

17% Dehy. Alfalfa Pellets, KC, ton

275.00

275.00

270.00

290.00

Millfeeds, Midds, Minneapolis, ton

68.00

70.00

105.00

95.00

Molasses, Cane, Houston, ton

142.50

142.50

147.50

150.00

Dried Citrus Pulp, Atlanta, ton

185.00

185.00

195.00

200.00

Whey, Whole, Chicago, cwt.

24.25

24.25

19.75

43.25

Rolled Oats, Minneapolis, ton

446.00

446.00

458.00

495.00

Barley, Los Angeles, cwt.

10.05

10.10

9.70

9.40

Feeding Wheat, Kansas City, bu.

4.92

4.85

4.90

5.00

*Chicago corn and soybean prices for latest and previous week are the middle of the range of to-arrive bids; soybean meal prices are midrange of processor quotes. Chicago corn and soybean prices provided by USDA Market News. Six months, year ago comparisons are all spot cash. Based on prices reported by Feedstuffs' market reporters.

A: average

N/A: not available