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CWD discovered in two wild deer in southeast Minnesota

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) identified two positive cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild deer near Lanesboro, Minn.

The Minnesota Board of Animal Health (BAH) is responding to help protect the state’s farmed and wild deer populations. A disease control zone with a 10-mile radius will be established around where the two CWD-positive deer were found. Farmed deer and elk herd owners within this zone will not be allowed to move deer or elk into or out of the zone until an investigation has been completed and movement restrictions released. There are four deer or elk farms located within this CWD control zone.

“We are restricting movement of farmed deer and elk within the disease control zone until we have finished our investigations and evaluated the risks on each farm for the transmission of CWD from wild to farmed animals,” BAH assistant director Dr. Paul Anderson said. “Our staff will personally notify each deer and elk farmer whose herd is located within the disease control zone and will begin the investigations.”

Minnesota is home to more than 11,000 farmed deer or elk on 462 farms around the state. All farmed deer and elk producers are required to test their animals for CWD. From each herd, all animals 12 months of age and older that die or are slaughtered must be tested for CWD. Tissue samples are tested for CWD at the University of Minnesota’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. To maintain accurate CWD surveillance, producers must report to BAH all deer or elk that die or are moved out of the herd to other locations.

CWD is a disease of deer and elk caused by an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, which can damage brain and nerve tissue. CWD poses no danger to other animal species and is not known to affect humans. It is most likely transmitted between deer and elk through the shedding of prions in saliva, feces, urine and other fluids or tissues. There are no known treatments or vaccines.

CME changes soybean meal protein specifications, amends futures contract

CME Group announced last week that it is adjusting the protein specification for soybean meal and that it is implementing amendments to the soybean meal futures contract.

CME temporarily delisted the July 2019, October 2019 and December 2019 soybean meal futures contract months, but effective Dec. 15, 2016, those previously delisted contract months will be once again listed for trading. CME said it will also list the following new contract months: January 2019, March 2019, May 2019, July 2019, August 2019, September 2019, October 2019, December 2019, July 2020, October 2020 and December 2020.

Regarding the protein specifications, the exchange said the protein content of domestically grown soybeans has been decreasing as soybean production has shifted north and west. It said the cash market for soybean meal has evolved predominantly to a protein specification under CME’s 48.0% protein minimum. As a result, CME said it is adjusting protein specification down one-half of 1%; par will be 47.5% protein, with delivery without penalty or rejection down to 47.0%.

According to Reuters, CME is also considering adding St. Louis, Mo., as a delivery point for its corn futures contracts and has delayed listing new contracts from a Dec. 14 kickoff until it makes a decision. St. Louis is already a delivery point for both wheat and soybeans.

If approved, St. Louis would be the southernmost delivery point and should provide new options for farmers and traders along the lower Illinois River and the Mississippi River, said Fred Seamon, CME senior director of commodity research and product development.

The last time CME made changes to its delivery points for the corn contract was in 2000.

Lower prices for milk, pork expected during holidays

Lower prices for milk and pork mean consumers should expect holiday treats and meals to cost a little less this year, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert Dr. David Anderson said.

Anderson, an extension livestock economist in College Station, Texas, said items such as milk, butter, cheese, cream, hams, pork trimmings and bacon should all be priced lower than in 2015.

He said demand for milk and cream began surging in September, when manufacturers began processing products for consumption during November and December.

“Some prices have rebounded, and there is usually a surge in demand for the holidays,” he said. “I noticed eggnog was being put on shelves. So, all those seasonal and specialty products that use milk are driving demand.”

Anderson said there was increased demand already for some relatively new products like Greek yogurt and protein supplements. There has also been an increase in demand from consumers who are ditching products like margarine, which is made from vegetable oil, and returning to more traditional products like natural butter.

However, higher supplies and lower costs are offsetting increased demand, he said. On average, consumers will pay 4.6 cents less for a gallon of milk than they did a year ago.

Anderson said consumers may also notice lower prices for pork products as a result of lower feed prices and expanded production. The pork industry just had its largest hog slaughter on record in the U.S.

Bacon prices are 9% lower than last year, and pork trimmings are 18% lower, he said. Hams, which experience a surge in demand during the holidays, were priced only 1.6% lower than last year.

The demand for milk and pork peaks not only for consumers but also for businesses and retailers making seasonal items people want during the holidays.

“During the holidays, it’s not just the milk and pork that are consumed during holiday meals,” he said. “It’s also all the ingredients that those things represent -- the cream and cheese and bacon and sausage – the ingredients that go into making all those Thanksgiving and Christmas goodies.”

N&H TOP LINE: New insights into global warming 'hiatus'

N&H TOP LINE: New insights into global warming 'hiatus'

A new multi-institutional study of the so-called global warming "hiatus" phenomenon — the possible temporary slowdown of the global mean surface temperature (GMST) trend said to have occurred from 1998 to 2013 — concludes the hiatus simply represents a redistribution of energy within the Earth system, which includes the land, atmosphere and the ocean.

In particular, the researcher's point to the prominent role played by the global ocean in absorbing the extra heat from the atmosphere by acting as a "heat sink" as an explanation for the observed decrease in GMST, which is considered a key indicator of climate change.

A multi-institutional study, led by the University of Delaware, sheds light into global warming "hiatus. " Photo credit: Doug White.

In a study published in Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, lead author Xiao-Hai Yan of the University of Delaware, along with scientists from the National Aeronautics & Space Administration's (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Cal., and several other institutions discuss new understanding of the phenomenon.

"The hiatus period gives scientists an opportunity to understand uncertainties in how climate systems are measured, as well as to fill in the gap in what scientists know," Yan said.

"NASA's examination of ocean observations has provided its own unique contribution to our knowledge of decadal climate trends and global warming," said Veronica Nieves, a researcher at JPL and the University of California-Los Angeles and co-author of the new study. "Scientists have more confidence now that Earth's ocean has continued to warm continuously through time, but the rate of global surface warming can fluctuate due to natural variations in the climate system over periods of a decade or so."

Co-author Kevin Trenberth of the National Center for Atmospheric Research added, "The hiatus in the rise of global surface temperature is over, but understanding the processes involved helps us with future predictions."

Where's the missing heat?

While Yan said it's difficult to reach complete consensus on such a complex topic, a thorough review of the literature and much discussion and debate revealed a number of key points on which these leading scientists concur:

* From 1998 to 2013, the rate of global mean surface warming, which some call the "global warming hiatus," slowed.

* Natural variability plays a large role in the rate of global mean surface warming on decadal time scales.

* Improved understanding of how the ocean distributes and redistributes heat will help the scientific community better monitor Earth's energy budget. Earth's energy budget is a complex calculation of how much energy enters the climate system from the sun and what happens to it: how much is stored by the land, ocean or atmosphere.

"To better monitor Earth's energy budget and its consequences, the ocean is most important to consider because the amount of heat it can store is extremely large when compared to the land or atmospheric capacity," Yan said.

According to the paper, "arguably, ocean heat content — from the surface to the seafloor — might be a more appropriate measure of how much our planet is warming."

Charting future research

In the near term, the researchers hope this paper will lay the foundation for future research in the global change field. To begin, they suggest the climate community replace the term "global warming hiatus" with "global surface warming slowdown" to eliminate confusion.

"This terminology more accurately describes the slowdown in global mean surface temperature rise in the late 20th century," Yan said.

The scientists also called for continued support of current and future technologies for ocean monitoring to reduce observation errors in sea surface temperature and ocean heat content. This includes maintaining Argo, the main system for monitoring ocean heat content, and the development of Deep Argo to monitor the lower half of the ocean; the use of ship-based subsurface ocean temperature monitoring programs; advancements in robotic technologies such as autonomous underwater vehicles to monitor waters adjacent to land (like islands or coastal regions), and further development of real- or near-real-time deep ocean remote sensing methods.

Variability and heat sequestration over specific regions (e.g., Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern Oceans, etc.) require further investigation, the researchers concluded. However, there is broad agreement among the scientists and in the literature that the slowdown in the global mean surface temperature increase from 1998 to 2013 was due to increased uptake of heat energy by the global ocean.

This research article is open access. A PDF copy of the article can be downloaded at the following link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016EF000417/pdf.

Trouw Nutrition launches global validation program

Trouw Nutrition, Nutreco’s animal nutrition division, has launched a global validation program to demonstrate the effectiveness of its nutritional solutions in different geographies and markets.

Validation centers have been established on five continents, where Trouw Nutrition Research & Development (R&D) is collaborating with universities and regional science partners. The validation of products in regional markets is important to accelerate the transfer of best practices from one market to the other, the company said. The initial focus of the program is on feed additives, animal health supporting products and young animal feed.

“We develop new products, models and service tools at our global research centers, but a proof of concept is important. Application knowledge taking into account local conditions, such as climate and farming practices, is a critical success factor of many innovations we develop,” said Leo den Hartog, director of Trouw Nutrition R&D. “A good example is our blended feed additive solutions. Validation studies in different regions have already shown that similar performance responses can be obtained compared to antimicrobial growth promoters."

The validation teams are based in the Asia Pacific, Brazil, China, Europe and North America. Research proposals are set up in close collaboration with universities, research institutes and key customers in the respective regions.

Based on standardized protocols, the teams will execute validation trials of nutritional solutions that have been developed in the five research centers Trouw Nutrition operates in the Netherlands, Canada and Spain.

Ingredient market prices, 11/21/16

The following prices, which include delivery, were obtained Nov. 21 from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. The prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. Second column shows the amount of change since the previous week. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used. U.S. short tons, 2,000 lb. N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available.

OILSEED PRODUCTS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boston

346.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

330.00

12.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

345.40

73.00

Kansas City

300.00

5.00

Los Angeles

361.00

12.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

297.00

14.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

361.00

12.00

Twin Falls

375.00

12.00

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boston

341.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

318.00

12.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

300.00

5.00

Los Angeles

340.00

10.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

340.00

10.00

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

200.00

-

Buffalo*

N/A

-

Chicago

115.00

-

Fayetteville, NC

220.00

-

Ft. Worth*

150.00

-10.00

Los Angeles

155.00

-2.00

Minneapolis

100.00

-10.00

Okeechobee

200.00

-

San Francisco

155.00

-2.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

* unpelleted

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

200.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

236.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

200.00

-

Ft. Worth

240.00

-

Los Angeles

320.00

5.00

Lubbock

205.00

-5.00

Memphis

200.00

-

Okeechobee

217.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

320.00

5.00

Twin Falls

300.00

-

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

325.00

-

Chicago

260.00

-

Delmarva

325.00

-

Fayetteville NC

325.00

-

Ft. Worth

270.00

-5.00

Kansas City

270.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

240.00

-

Memphis

210.00

-5.00

Okeechobee

335.00

-

San Francisco

240.00

2.00

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

325.00

-

Chicago

185.00

-

Fayetteville NC

325.00

-

Ft. Worth

125.00

-5.00

Okeechobee

362.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

90.00

-

San Francisco

224.00

-

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

208.40

-

Los Angeles

245.00

10.00

Montreal

246.00

17.00

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

245.00

10.00

Twin Falls

345.00

110.00

Vancouver

215.00

5.00

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

140.00

-

Minneapolis

135.00

-

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

345.00

-

Fargo

270.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

306.00

-

Kansas City

225.00

-

Minneapolis

320.00

-

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

138.00

-

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

235.00

-

Delmarva

330.00

5.00

Fayetteville NC

260.00

-10.00

Ft. Worth

210.00

-10.00

Kansas City

215.00

-

Los Angeles

260.00

-

Memphis

250.00

-10.00

Minneapolis

220.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

260.00

-

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

270.00

-10.00

Los Angeles

300.40

-

Memphis

260.00

-10.00

Minneapolis

225.00

-

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

825.00

-

Los Angeles

875.00

-

Memphis

800.00

-

Minneapolis

850.00

-

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

850.00

-

Memphis

825.00

-

Minneapolis

850.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

270.00

-

Ft. Worth

225.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

369.00

-

Memphis

270.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

575.00

25.00

Fayetteville NC

575.00

25.00

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

330.00

-

Delmarva

315.00

-

Fayetteville NC

330.00

-

Ft. Worth

345.00

-

Kansas City

380.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

330.00

-

Minneapolis

370.00

10.00

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1450.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1350.00

-

Minneapolis

1540.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

28.50

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

24.25

-

San Francisco

23.38

-

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

24.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

23.00

-

Ft. Worth

25.50

-

Kansas City

25.75

-

Los Angeles

23.25

-

Memphis

23.00

-

Minneapolis

22.00

-

San Francisco

22.38

-

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

26.50

-

Minneapolis

26.50

-

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

29.00

-

Ft. Worth

32.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

30.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

26.00

-

Los Angeles

22.88

-

Minneapolis

23.00

-

San Francisco

22.88

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

22.00

-

Fayetteville NC

22.00

-

Memphis

22.00

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

29.00

-

Fayetteville NC

29.00

-

GLUTEN, HOMINY

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

503.00

5.00

Kansas City

530.00

-

Los Angeles

550.00

-

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

107.00

-

Fayetteville NC

130.00

-

Kansas City

145.00

3.00

Okeechobee

150.00

-

Twin Falls

175.00

-40.00

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

205.00

-

Boston

144.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

88.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

85.00

5.00

Los Angeles

155.00

1.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

155.00

1.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

120.00

-

Milwaukee

95.00

-

Winona, Minn

95.00

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

198.00

-

Boston

158.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

105.00

-

Fayetteville NC

198.00

-

Kansas City

125.00

-

Los Angeles

165.00

-

Minneapolis

100.00

-

Okeechobee

208.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

165.00

-

Twin Falls

173.00

3.00

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.75

-

Milwaukee

0.75

-

Minneapolis

0.75

-

ALFALFA

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Central Neb.

235.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

310.00

-

Kansas City

230.00

20.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

245.00

-

Toledo

315.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

180.00

-5.00

Kansas City

180.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

95.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

139.00

-

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

130.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

115.00

5.00

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

115.00

-

Los Angeles

134.00

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

85.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

140.00

-

Kansas City

85.00

-

Los Angeles

137.00

-

Memphis

140.00

6.00

Minneapolis

70.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

35.00

0.50

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

27.00

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Milwaukee

-

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

410.00

-

Kansas City

340.00

-

Minneapolis

572.00

-

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

380.00

-

Kansas City

275.00

-

Minneapolis

417.00

-

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

120.00

-

Minneapolis

138.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

60.00

-

Kansas City

30.00

-

Minneapolis

72.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

2.67

-

Portland*

N/A

-

(*per ton)

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

165.00

-

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

132.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

105.00

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

102.00

5.00

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

108.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

62.00

2.00

Kansas City

60.00

-

DRIED PULP

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

185.00

-

Fayetteville NC

195.00

-

Okeechobee

160.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

150.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

440.00

-

Minneapolis

120.00

-

Portland

148.00

-

Saginaw

140.00

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls (sacked)

355.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

135.00

-

*bulk, wet

GRAINS

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City (bu.)

4.30

-

Los Angeles (cwt)

8.45

0.07

Portland (ton)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

8.45

0.07

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC (bu.)

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

3.70

0.05

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

5.11

0.03

Boston

3.65

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

3.65

0.13

Delmarva

7.17

3.11

Fayetteville NC

5.11

0.03

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.35

0.16

Los Angeles*

8.50

0.03

San Fran (rail)*

8.50

0.03

San Fran (truck)*

N/A

-

Memphis

3.60

0.10

Minneapolis

2.93

-

Okeechobee

5.34

0.03

Portland (per ton)

N/A

-

(*per cwt)

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

3.26

0.12

Kansas City

2.89

0.11

Los Angeles*

8.25

0.05

Memphis

N/A

-

*(per cwt.)

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Ft.  Worth

419.00

10.00

Kansas City

50.00

-

OTHER

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

92.00

-

San Francisco

68.00

-

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

165.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

170.00

-

Memphis

160.00

-

Minneapolis

150.00

-

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas City

58.00

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

132.50

-

Kansas City

172.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

182.50

-

New Orleans

137.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

FDA releases 2014 NARMS integrated report

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has released its 2014 National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) Integrated Report, highlighting antimicrobial resistance patterns in bacteria isolated from humans, retail meats and animals at slaughter.

Specifically, FDA said the report focuses on major foodborne bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics that are considered important to human medicine and on multi-drug-resistant organisms (described as resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics).

NARMS was established in 1996 as a partnership among FDA, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to track antibiotic resistance in foodborne bacteria. NARMS is critically important for monitoring trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria collected from humans, retail meats and food-producing animals. In particular, it assists FDA in making data-driven decisions on the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals.

The agency said NARMS will also be critical in evaluating the effectiveness of FDA’s Guidance for Industry #213 and the agricultural objectives in the Administration’s National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

Findings

FDA listed the following points to summarize important observations from the 2014 NARMS Integrated Report. There are few changes from the 2012-13 NARMS Integrated Report. Overall resistance continues to remain low for most human infections, and there have been measurable improvements in resistance levels in some important areas.

Moving in the right direction:

1. The prevalence of salmonella in both retail chicken meat (9.1%) and retail ground turkey (5.5%) was at its lowest level since retail meat testing began in 2002. The prevalence of campylobacter in retail chicken meat samples has gradually declined over time to 33%, the lowest level since testing began.

2. Approximately 80% of human salmonella isolates are not resistant to any of the tested antibiotics. This has remained relatively stable over the past 10 years, FDA said. Resistance for three critically important drugs -- ceftriaxone, azithromycin and ciprofloxacin -- in human non-typhoidal salmonella isolates remained below 3%.

3. Overall, ceftriaxone resistance continued to decline in non-typhoidal salmonella from all NARMS sources, with the exception of retail turkey meat isolates, where it rose slightly. This was paralleled by a decline in ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli from retail chicken meat (from 13% in 2011 to 6.6% in 2014). In cattle, salmonella isolates from carcasses collected at processing plants as part of pathogen reduction/hazard analysis critical control point (PR/HACCP) testing, ceftriaxone resistance reached its lowest level (7.6%) since 1999. In 2014, ceftriaxone resistance in human Salmonella Heidelberg isolates was 8.5%, down from a peak of 24% in 2010.

4. Among all salmonella serotypes, the percentage of human isolates resistant to at least ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracyclines (ACSSuT) continued a steady decline to 3.1%, the lowest since testing began in 1996 (8.7%). Similarly, ACSSuT resistance in cattle PR/HACCP Salmonella typhimurium isolates declined sharply from 67% in 2009 to 7% in 2014, the lowest level since this testing began in 1997.

5. With the exception of five isolates in the past 10 years, no resistance has been detected in enterococcus bacteria isolates to three important drugs: daptomycin, linezolid and vancomycin.

Still of concern:

While a majority of the observations in the 2014 NARMS Integrated Report show desirable trends, FDA said there are a few findings of potential concern, including:

1. Decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin has increased in human and cattle (PR/HACCP) salmonella serotype Dublin isolates since 2003, with slight declines since 2012. While the incidence of human Salmonella Dublin infections is relatively low, can cause invasive disease with more severe outcomes and ranks among the top four serotypes isolated from retail ground beef and cattle PR/HACCP samples.

2. Multi-drug-resistant salmonella from turkey PR/HACCP samples has increased from approximately 27% to 41% over the past 10 years.

3. High and increasing levels of ciprofloxacin resistance were detected in Campylobacter jejuni from human (26.7%) and chicken PR/HACCP (28%) samples in 2014 and remained above 35% in Campylobacter coli from humans.

The NARMS Integrated report covers a time period before the full implementation of FDA's Guidance for Industry #213, which announced a specific strategy for animal drug companies to voluntarily revise the labeling of their medically important antimicrobials used in the feed and water of food-producing animals to withdraw approved production uses and place the remaining therapeutic uses of these products under veterinary oversight. The affected animal drug companies have agreed to implement this strategy by the end of December 2016.

LIVESTOCK MARKETS: Feedlots chewing through cattle supplies

LIVESTOCK MARKETS: Feedlots chewing through cattle supplies

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Service recently released the latest “Cattle on Feed” report, with results that were near pre-report analyst estimates.

The report showed that feedlots continued a strong marketing pace in October with marketings up 4.6% year over year, despite one less business day in the month. October placements followed the September monthly decrease with another 5% reduction in placements year over year (Figure). The combination of large marketings and fewer placements left the Nov. 1, 2016 cattle on feed inventory down 1.3% from one year ago at 10.665 million head.

Source: USDA NASS

In the “Daily Livestock Report,” Steiner Consulting Group said a number of factors have limited placements so far this fall.

“Weather in key production areas has been quite mild and this has allowed producers to keep animals outside of feedlots, particularly given the extremely volatile markets and depressed fed cattle prices out front,” the report said.

Additionally, Steiner suggested that feedlots have also been struggling with poor margins, and this has limited demand for calves to be placed on feed in early fall.

Jim Robb of the Livestock Marketing Information Center also pointed out that part of the reason for the reduction in placements may be due to fewer dairy calves now going into feedlots as some packers have limited or stopped buying dairy bred animals.

Oklahoma State University Extension livestock marketing specialist Derrell Peel said despite the year-over-year decreases in placements in September and October, total feedlot placements are currently up 673,000 head from 2015, a 3.9% increase for the year to date. However, year-to-date feedlot marketings through October are up an impressive 5.2%, or some 855,000 head more than the same period last year. In fact, Peel said that in the last six months, the year-over-year increase in feedlot marketings has been more than double the increase in the number of cattle placed in feedlots compared to last year.

“The faster pace of cattle movement through feedlots has translated in more cattle slaughter and more beef production in 2016 than previously expected,” he said.

Year-to-date beef production is 5.3% higher than last year. Steer slaughter, in particular, has exceeded expectations this fall and is up nearly 7% year over year so far this year, though it is expected to moderate to smaller year-over-year increases for the remainder of the year, Peel noted.

“Additional steer slaughter, combined with year-over-year increases in heifer and cow slaughter have pushed total cattle slaughter up 5.6% so far this year. Increased slaughter is partially offset with lower carcass weights since May,” Peel said.

Weekly steer carcass weights have averaged 9 lb. less since May with heifer and cow carcass weights down about 2 lb. on a weekly average basis. Peel said carcass weights have been down from last year's record levels despite excellent feeding conditions this fall.

“Both steer and heifer carcass weights appear to have peaked seasonally the last week of October and should decline for the remainder of the year. The first winter storm, which covered the central and northern Plains last week, may help pull carcass weights down faster in November,” he said.

According to Peel, the decrease in feedlot placements in September and October likely means that some feeder cattle are being retained and will be pushed into next year.

“Certainly, there has been plenty of market incentive for cattle to be retained out in the country this fall. This may result is some additional increase in feeder supplies in 2017 on top of growing feeder supplies due to a bigger 2016 calf crop,” Peel said.

He said to remember, however, that growing domestic feeder supplies are being partially offset by a 29% year-over-year decrease in feeder cattle imports from Mexico and Canada so far this year, totaling 336,000 head fewer imports through September.

“These delayed fall feeder cattle are not expected to burden feeder markets excessively unless they get bunched up next spring," Peel said. "However, these retained feeders are being held in a wide variety of stocker and backgrounding programs across the country and will likely be spread out in weight and timing next spring.”

Peel noted that wheat pasture stocking has been slow this fall and additional stocker placements on wheat may continue after Jan. 1 as producers look to graze out more wheat acres unless wheat market prospects improve significantly.

Overall, Steiner Consulting suggested that smaller on feed supplies and relatively more current feedlot conditions should help support fed cattle values in the very short term.

“It is unclear that futures at this point have priced enough of a winter weather premium, especially for February," the firm said. "The main challenge for the beef market is post-holiday demand. Meat protein supplies are plentiful, and there will be fierce competition for the meat case in January and February. Summer futures are heavily discounted as the market expects placements to increase in (the first quarter of 2017).”

Soybeans at 3-month high on export-driven rally: Podcast

Soybeans were a few cents higher near midday on Tuesday to set a three-month high as investors continue to be cheered by recent export business. No new soybean sales were reported on Tuesday, but USDA did say China bought 30,000 metric tons of soybean oil.

Rain moved through Kansas and the central Plains, while the dry southeast will be missed by storms for  the next several days.

Bob Burgdorfer of Farm Futures reporting. Farm Futures is a sister publication of Feedstuffs.

 

State implements new Georgia dock requirement amid concerns

Concerns surrounding potential price-fixing of the Georgia dock price index have continued to gain momentum, prompting the Georgia Department of Agriculture (GDA) to implement at least one change while the issue is being investigated.

Julie McPeake, a spokeswoman for GDA, confirmed to the Wall Street Journal Nov. 22 that beginning next week the agency is requiring the reporting companies to submit a signed affidavit and attestation. The attestation will be required for each individual employee submitting information to the Georgia Poultry Market News and the affidavit will be required of each company.

"This effort is being done to solidify the Poultry Market News Reports while ensuring that proprietary information is protected," she said.

According to the WSJ, this marks the first time in more than four decades that there’s been a major change to the Georgia Dock.

McPeake confirmed that both the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Florida attorney general’s office have been pressing GDA for information about it compiles the index.

Tom Hayes, president of Tyson Foods, addressed Nov. 21 the topic during the company’s quarterly results conference call after questions arose about Tyson’s part in the price index since it is one of the largest companies to contribute prices to the index.

Hayes said approximately 3.5-4% of its total chicken sales are negotiated off the Georgia Dock. However, he added that customers can negotiate using whatever index they choose.

“We have talked several times that we used a lot of different pricing mechanisms, and we are diversified; we don’t feel like it has significant impact to us. But the Georgia Dock has had very little influence on our price and strategy,” he said.

Hayes said the company has found that the Georgia dock price index is not a good proxy for cost. He said the company has some very sophisticated buyers that tend to look more at grain inputs than they do the Georgia Dock. “Certainly it's got a lot of history and it's something that's been around for a while, but we find increasingly our customers are looking to have discussions about where do they think grain is.”

When asked, Dennis Leatherby, executive vice president and chief financial officer, said the company would feel no impact if the Georgia dock “went away.”