Feedstuffs is part of the Informa Markets Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Cattle disease traceability continues advancing

Peter Milota Jr./iStock/Thinkstock cattle

Multiple state cattle organizations from major beef-producing regions have partnered to form U.S. CattleTrace, a disease traceability initiative. The goal is to develop a national infrastructure for disease traceability and encourage private industry to use the infrastructure for individualized management practices, the organizations said in an announcement.

The new U.S. CattleTrace initiative combines the efforts of CattleTrace, which includes multiple partners, including the Kansas Livestock Assn. and others in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Oregon and Washington, as well as traceability pilot projects underway in Florida and Texas, the announcement said. Those projects are facilitated by the Florida Cattlemen’s Assn., Texas Cattle Feeders Assn. (TCFA), Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Assn. and Kentucky Cattlemen’s Assn.

“With producers and industry stakeholders working together from across the country, the U.S. CattleTrace partnership will be a catalyst to build upon the CattleTrace foundation we established the past few years,” said Brandon Depenbusch, chairman of the CattleTrace board of directors. “We encourage other state organizations and individual producers to join our efforts in building a nationally significant animal disease traceability system for the United States. By working together, we will build something that works for the industry.”

Volunteer leaders from each of the partner organizations have agreed to a set of guiding principles for U.S. CattleTrace, including the following statements:

  • In order to protect the producers’ share of the protein market from the potential impact of a disease event, cattle identification and traceability need to be enacted, enhanced and further developed using electronic identification and electronic transfer of data.
  • U.S. CattleTrace is focused on developing a voluntary national traceability system to include all cattle and complement current U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations.
  • The goal is to build a system that is recognized as nationally significant to all domestic and foreign markets.
  • The U.S. CattleTrace disease traceability system strives to be equitable to all industry segments and must be industry-driven and managed by a producer board of directors to ensure data privacy and protection.
  • U.S. CattleTrace supports the use of one technology for a U.S. maximize the value of technology investment. Since multiple radio-frequency identification technologies are in use today, U.S. CattleTrace will accept data in a standardized electronic format from available technologies but supports a transition to ultra-high-frequency technology by Dec. 31, 2023.

“Cattle disease traceability is a top priority in the beef cattle industry, and this partnership will continue to help guide the development of an enhanced traceability system in the United States,” TCFA past chairman Jim Lovell said. “Our different state projects have always had a similar goal in mind: to develop a disease traceability system that works across the country. Combining our efforts makes this initiative stronger on a national level.”

For more information about U.S. CattleTrace, including details on how to get involved, visit www.UScattletrace.org.

In late August 2018, CattleTrace Inc. was formally established as a private, not-for-profit corporation to securely maintain and manage the data collected as part of the disease traceability pilot project. A board of directors with representatives from the cow/calf, livestock market and cattle feeding sectors was named to lead CattleTrace Inc. In January 2020, the board voted to change the name to U.S. CattleTrace Inc. to formally establish the multi-state initiative to advance disease traceability.

EPA ushers in new water rule

USDA Photo by Preston Keres Cattle grazing by farm pond USDA.jpg
PONDS UNDER EPA JURISDICTION: Agricultural stakeholders seek clarifications in EPA's waters of the U.S. rule to exempt farm ponds and other normal agricultural practices.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of the Army proposed a new "waters of the U.S." rule – now called the Navigable Waters Protection Rule – in an ongoing attempt to offer clarity for farmers and landowners to better understand what water features fall under federal jurisdiction while following congressional intent and adhering to court cases.

The main focus of the new rule clarifies four distinct categories of waters that are regulated under the federal Clean Water Act: territorial seas and traditional navigable waters, like the Atlantic Ocean and the Mississippi River; perennial and intermittent tributaries, such as College Creek, which flows to the James River near Williamsburg, Va.; certain lakes, ponds and impoundments, such as Children’s Lake in Boiling Springs, Pa., and wetlands that are adjacent to jurisdictional waters.

The rule also offers 12 exclusions, detailing which waters are not subject to federal control, including features that only contain water in direct response to rainfall; groundwater; many ditches, including most farm and roadside ditches; prior converted cropland; farm and stock watering ponds, and waste treatment systems.

“After decades of landowners relying on expensive attorneys to determine what water on their land may or may not fall under federal regulations, our new Navigable Waters Protection Rule strikes the proper balance between Washington and the states in managing land and water resources while protecting our nation’s navigable waters, and it does so within the authority Congress provided,” EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said during a media call Thursday afternoon.

“Having farmed American land myself for decades, I have personally experienced the confusion regarding implementation of the scope of the Clean Water Act,” added R.D. James, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works. “Our rule takes a commonsense approach to implementation to eliminate that confusion. This rule also eliminates federal overreach and strikes the proper balance between federal protection of our nation’s waters and state autonomy over their aquatic resources. This will ensure that land use decisions are not improperly constrained, which will enable our farmers to continue feeding our nation and the world and our businesses to continue thriving.”

In a separate statement, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said, “The days are gone when the federal government can claim a small farm pond on private land as navigable waters.”

In offering technical background on the rule, an EPA official said tributaries – those that experience perennial and intermittent flow – created the most confusion, and this rule looks to address those issues. The official stated that the new rule draws a regulatory line at ephemeral flows – or those that do not have a permanent flow – but does include flows that go into traditional navigable waters.

The final rule defines “lakes and ponds and impoundments of jurisdictional waters” as standing bodies of open water that contribute surface water flow in a typical year to a territorial sea or traditional navigable water either directly or through a tributary, another jurisdictional lake, pond or impoundment or an adjacent wetland.

This final action is informed by robust public outreach and engagement on the Navigable Waters Protection Rule, including pre-proposal engagement that generated more than 6,000 recommendations and approximately 620,000 comments on the proposal. The final definition balances the input the agencies received from a wide range of stakeholders. The final definition achieves the proper relationship between the federal government and states in managing land and water resources. The agencies’ Navigable Waters Protection Rule respects the primary role of states and tribes in managing their own land and water resources. All states have their own protections for waters within their borders, and many already regulate more broadly than the federal government. This action gives states and tribes more flexibility in determining how best to manage their land and water resources while protecting the nation’s navigable waters as Congress intended when it enacted the Clean Water Act.

The significant nexus test – elaborated extensively in the 2015 rule – relied on ample evidence to demonstrate “many wetlands and open waters located outside of riparian areas and floodplains, even when lacking surface water connections, provide physical, chemical and biological functions that could affect the integrity of downstream waters.” The official said although “science has informed” this latest version, it does not follow the premise of a previous connectivity report that contended that all waters are connected; instead, it looks at the significance of each connection. This becomes important when wetlands or features are closer to major tributary waters but less when drawing the line between ephemeral and intermittent waters.

Read the full rule here.

Disease, trade continue to dominate pork outlook

ALesik_iStock_Thinkstock swine barn and feed bin on cloudy day hog farm pig

Rising disease pressures continue to challenge the global market and will remain the major change driver in global animal protein in 2020, according to Rabobank’s latest quarterly pork report titled “Opportunities Are Emerging from Risks.”

“Although the severity of African swine fever’s (ASF) impact is subdued in some regions, the scope of the disease has expanded over recent months,” Rabobank senior animal protein analyst Chenjun Pan said. “The ramifications in 2020 will lead to continuous caution on production expansion in some regions and higher import demand on the global balance sheet.”

Further, Rabobank said several ongoing, regional trade deal discussions will also continue to influence global trade flows, although the phase one U.S.-China trade deal “will open up opportunities for U.S. exporters to increase shipments to China.”

China: More imports expected

ASF continues to spread in China, although the pace has slowed. Policies encourage restocking and production expansion, which is currently conducted by large companies with better biosecurity and modern farming facilities. As restocking is mainly achieved by keeping gilts, Rabobank expects to see a further drop in local production in 2020, which will reduce overall pork production. This suggests that imports in 2020 will increase above record levels.

China’s National Bureau of Statistics reported that as of Jan. 17, pork output in 2019 was 42.55 million tons, a decrease of 21.3% compared with 2018.

A Pork Checkoff report suggests that the 2020 outlook for China remains bleak due to the large loss in the country’s breeding herd last year — half of its swine herd, which equates to roughly one-quarter of the world’s swine herd.

“We continue to monitor the situation closely here and hope that China will see some relief, but it’s not looking very promising, with reports of ongoing ASF outbreaks and no real sense that an overall control strategy is being adhered to in the country,” said Dave Pyburn, chief veterinarian for the Pork Checkoff. "Without a stringent control methodology that’s fully implemented, ASF will continue to plague China for years.” 

Europe: Slow production growth

Following an estimated slight decline in 2019, the Rabobank report suggests that European Union pork production will increase by about 1% in 2020, driven by high prices and strong export demand. However, uncertainties, such as the Brexit trade deal negotiation and local ASF risks, will affect EU production and trade, the bank noted.

US: Continued production growth in 2020

According to the Rabobank report, U.S. pork production in 2020 is expected to rise 3.2% year over year, driven by modest growth in the breeding herd and improvement in productivity. Pork export demand will remain robust, due to expected increasing shipments following the implementation of the trade agreements with China and Japan. However, Rabobank said labor shortages remain a key constraint in 2020, as increases in hog supplies continue to outpace packer capacity – an issue that faster packing line speeds could help mitigate.

Brazil: Export levels move higher

As seen in 2019, the impact of ASF is expected to raise international demand for Brazil's pork even further. Likewise, domestic demand is consistently improving on the back of ongoing economic reforms. With feed costs expected to remain reasonable and price levels expected to remain high, margins along the production chain will be well supported in 2020, the report relayed.

Market recap

April live cattle futures were lower this week following the holiday weekend. Contracts closed Tuesday at $127.225/cwt. and Thursday at $124.175/cwt.

March feeder cattle futures were lower this week, closing lower Tuesday at $144.675/cwt. and Thursday at $140.525/cwt.

For beef cutout prices, Choice closed higher Thursday at $215.32/cwt., but Select closed lower at $211.20/cwt.

April lean hog futures contracts were higher following the holiday but saw slight gains as the week progressed. Contracts closed lower Tuesday at $73.825/cwt. but rose to a higher close Thursday at $75.35/cwt.

The pork cutout was mostly higher, with the wholesale pork cutout closing at $78.84/cwt. Loins were higher at $70.65/cwt., while hams were lower at $73.24/cwt. Bellies were sharply higher at $115.39/cwt.

Hogs delivered to the western Corn Belt closed at $51.64/cwt. on Thursday.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported the Eastern Region whole broiler/fryer weighted average price on Jan. 17 at 92.15 cents/lb.

According to USDA, egg prices were steady, with a steady to higher undertone. Offerings and supplies were both light to moderate. Demand was moderate to good.

Large eggs delivered to the Northeast were unchanged at 67-71 cents/doz. Prices in the Southeast and Midwest were unchanged at 71-74 cents/doz. and 59-62 cents/doz. Large eggs delivered to California were $1.42/doz.

For turkeys, USDA said the market was steady to firm, and demand was light to moderate. The price range for hens and toms was unchanged at 91 cents to $1.00/lb.

New experimental ASF vaccine shows 'promise'

apidachjsw/iStock/Thinkstock Pigs drinking_apidachjsw_iStock_Thinkstock-496829484.jpg

Government and academic investigators have developed a vaccine against African swine fever (ASF) that appears to be far more effective than previously developed vaccines, according to research published this week in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM).

A pre-publication version of the research article was recently circulated through social media, but the article has now completed the ASM peer-review process.

ASF has been devastating the swine industry in Eastern Europe for more than 12 years and Southeast Asia since August 2018. ASF virus (ASFV) is highly contagious and often lethal to domesticated and wild pigs, but humans are not susceptible to ASFV.

While there is currently no commercially available ASF vaccine, several institutions are working on various approaches to developing a vaccine. According to the report, outbreaks have been quelled — more or less — "by animal quarantine and slaughter," ASM said in an announcement.

In the Journal of Virology study, both low and high doses of the vaccine were 100% effective against the virus when the pigs were challenged 28 days post-inoculation, the researchers said.

The research was motivated by the 2007 outbreak of ASF in the Republic of Georgia, said principal investigator Douglas P. Gladue, senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). "This was the first outbreak in recent history outside of Africa and Sardinia — where swine fever is endemic — and this particular strain has been highly lethal and highly contagious, spreading quickly to neighboring countries." This is also a new strain of the virus, now known as ASFV-G (the G stands for Georgia).

The 2007 outbreak was also the genesis of the ASF outbreak that has been spreading through Eastern Europe and East Asia, Dr. Manuel V. Borca, another PIADC senior scientist, added.

There is limited cross-protection among ASFV strains, likely because the antigens and degree of virulence differ among them, and none of the historical experimental vaccines have been shown to be effective against ASFV-G, Gladue said.

So, the PIADC investigators set out to develop a vaccine. Part of the process of developing whole-virus vaccines involves deleting virulence genes from the virus, they explained. However, when the researchers deleted genes similar to those that had been deleted in older ASFV strains to attenuate them, "it became clear that ASFV-G was much more virulent" than the other historical isolates, because it retained a higher level of virulence, Gladue said. The investigators then realized that they needed a different genetic target in order to attenuate ASFV-G.

They used a predictive methodology called a computational pipeline to predict the roles of proteins on the virus. The computational pipeline predicted that a protein called I177l could interfere with the immune system of the pig. When they deleted this gene, ASFV-G was completely attenuated.

More work needs to be done to meet regulatory requirements for commercialization, Gladue said, but "this new experimental ASFV vaccine shows promise and offers complete protection against the current strain currently producing outbreaks throughout Eastern Europe and Asia."

Conagra sets packing goal to reduce plastic use

Conagra Conagra brand FDS WhiteLogo.png

Conagra Brands Inc. announced that it will strive toward making 100% of its current plastic packaging renewable, recyclable or compostable by 2025. The goal, Conagra said, accompanies current efforts to reduce the overall use of plastic and is part of the company's broader commitment to shaping a better planet, one of the four pillars of its corporate social responsibility and environmental, social and governance (ESG) efforts.

"Conagra is committed to being a caretaker of the environment," said Katya Hantel, Conagra director, sustainable development. "As part of this commitment, we are constantly challenging ourselves to more sustainably source packaging materials, generate less waste for disposal and help preserve our planet and its resources."

The company said packaging serves a critical role in maintaining both food freshness and safety but added that waste from plastic packaging is a growing issue. With the introduction of its sustainable packaging goal, Conagra is committing to producing packaging that takes environmental impacts into account while continuing to ensure food quality and safety. The company aims to reduce waste derived from packaging through thoughtful design and by using renewable and more readily recyclable or compostable materials.

Conagra has already made progress against its sustainable packaging goal with the introduction of plant-based bowls used in Healthy Choice Power Bowls products. Made from fiber, these bowls have helped Conagra avoid the use of more than 2.1 million lb. of plastic packaging since being introduced in 2017.

Over the next few years, the company aims to avoid the use of an additional 33 million lb. of plastic through further development of plant-based packaging options and other packaging innovations. Conagra also plans to ensure that all packaging features a How2Recycle label to provide clarity to consumers so that more materials are put into recycling bins.

"As a food company, packaging is an integral part of our product. That's why we are committed to making packaging decisions with the environment in mind," said Dr. Corey Berends, Conagra senior vice president, research and development. "We've set an ambitious goal, and we look forward to working with our suppliers and others in the industry to identify innovative solutions that maintain food safety and freshness while also reducing our packaging footprint."

Grain & ingredient cash market comparisons, 1/22/20

Major feed ingredients

Jan. 22

Jan. 15

6 mos. ago

Year ago

Corn No. 2, Chicago, bu., processor bid*

4.02A

4.00A

4.49A

3.68A

Corn No. 2, Chicago, bu., terminal bid*

3.81A

3.79A

4.14A

3.515A

Milo, Kansas City, cwt.

NA

NA

NA

NA

Soybeans, Chicago, bu., processor bid

9.04A

9.19A

8.735A

8.69A

Soybean meal, 48% Decatur bid

298.90A

300.60A

310.30A

311.90A

Cottonseed meal, Memphis, ton

225.00

225.00

215.00

240.00

Canola meal, Minneapolis, ton

234.10

NA

231.40

238.00

Linseed meal, solvent, Minneapolis

310.00

285.00

250.00

215.00

Meat and bone meal, Chicago, ton

250.00

250.00

228.00

270.00

Fish meal, menhaden, Atlanta, ton

1,400.00

NA

NA

NA

Corn gluten meal, 60%, Chicago, ton

525.00

465.00

415.00

498.00

Distillers dried grains, Chicago, ton

153.00

150.00

138.00

145.00

17% dehy. alfalfa pellets, Kansas City, ton

328.00

328.00

330.50

258.00

Millfeeds, midds, Minneapolis, ton

NA

NA

NA

NA

Molasses, cane, Houston, ton

147.50

155.00

135.00

125.00

Dried citrus pulp, Atlanta, ton

NA

NA

NA

NA

Whey, whole, Chicago, cwt.

34.50

34.00

35.13

47.00

Rolled oats, Minneapolis, ton

545.00

545.00

550.00

562.00

Barley, Los Angeles, cwt.

NA

NA

10.77

10.40

Feeding wheat, Kansas City, bu.

5.30

5.20

4.78

4.75

*Chicago corn and soybean prices for latest and previous week are the middle of the range of to-arrive bids; soybean meal prices are midrange of processor quotes. Chicago corn and soybean prices provided by USDA Market News. Six months, year ago comparisons are all spot cash. Based on prices reported by Feedstuffs' market reporters.

A: average

NA: not available

Ingredient market prices, 1/22/20

market

The following prices, which include delivery, were obtained Jan. 22 from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. The prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. Second column shows the amount of change since the previous week. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used. U.S. short tons, 2,000 lb. N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available. Click to download.

OILSEED PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

320.00

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

299.00

-3.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville

320.00

-

Ft. Worth

334.50

-

Kansas City

285.10

-2.90

Los Angeles

331.00

-11.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

350.00

-

Portland

333.55

-12.45

San Francisco

331.00

-11.00

Twin Falls

316.00

-33.00

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

287.00

-3.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

312.00

-11.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

312.00

-11.00

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

210.00

-

Buffalo*

N/A

-

Chicago

180.00

-

Fayetteville, NC

210.00

-

Ft. Worth*

80.00

-

Los Angeles

199.00

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

225.00

-60.00

San Francisco

199.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

* unpelleted

 

 

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

190.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

230.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville

180.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

336.00

-

Lubbock

N/A

-

Memphis

215.00

10.00

Okeechobee

198.00

-

Portland

380.00

-

San Francisco

336.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

275.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

277.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

N/A

-

Memphis

225.00

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

272.00

-1.00

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

225.00

-100.00

Chicago

160.00

-

Fayetteville

255.00

-100.00

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Okeechobee

235.00

-100.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

N/A

-

San Francisco

300.00

-

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

234.10

-

Los Angeles

276.00

-1.00

Montreal

283.00

1.00

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

275.00

-2.00

Twin Falls

276.00

-4.00

Vancouver

N/A

-

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

170.00

-

Minneapolis

205.00

-

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

270.00

-

Fargo

260.00

20.00

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

296.00

-

Kansas City

284.00

4.00

Minneapolis

310.00

25.00

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

193.00

2.00

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

250.00

-

Delmarva

320.00

5.00

Fayetteville

175.00

-

Ft. Worth

150.00

-

Kansas City

225.00

-

Los Angeles

210.00

-

Memphis

165.00

-

Minneapolis

190.00

-

Portland

187.50

-2.50

San Francisco

210.00

-

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

215.00

-5.00

Los Angeles

248.40

-

Memphis

195.00

-5.00

Minneapolis

225.00

-

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

875.00

85.00

Los Angeles

875.00

50.00

Memphis

850.00

75.00

Minneapolis

850.00

-

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

850.00

50.00

Memphis

850.00

50.00

Minneapolis

900.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

225.00

-

Fayetteville

225.00

-

Ft. Worth

210.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

225.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

475.00

-

Fayetteville

475.00

-

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

270.00

-

Delmarva

275.00

-

Fayetteville

295.00

-

Ft. Worth

275.00

-

Kansas City

305.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

285.00

-

Minneapolis

340.00

-

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

1400.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1425.00

-

Fayetteville

1400.00

-

Ft. Worth

1395.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1400.00

50.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

 

 

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

31.50

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

26.25

-1.00

San Francisco

N/A

-

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

21.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville

21.00

-

Ft. Worth

23.50

-

Kansas City

28.00

-

Los Angeles

25.25

-1.00

Memphis

21.00

-

Minneapolis

22.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

25.00

-

Minneapolis

27.00

-

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

31.00

-

Ft. Worth

31.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

29.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

24.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

22.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

26.50

1.00

Fayetteville

25.00

-

Memphis

25.00

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

28.00

-

Fayetteville

28.00

-

GLUTEN, HOMINY

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

525.00

60.00

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

155.00

-5.00

Fayetteville

190.00

-

Kansas City

201.00

-

Okeechobee

215.00

-25.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

190.00

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

118.00

-

Fayetteville

200.00

4.00

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

192.00

-1.00

Okeechobee

195.00

10.00

San Francisco

192.00

-1.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

140.00

-

Milwaukee

N/A

-

Winona, Minn

N/A

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

215.00

5.00

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

153.00

3.00

Fayetteville

220.00

-5.00

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

213.00

-3.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

230.00

-

Portland

211.50

1.00

San Francisco

213.00

-3.00

Twin Falls

220.00

5.00

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.70

-

Milwaukee

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

ALFALFA

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Central Neb.

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

290.00

-

Kansas City

328.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

245.00

-

Toledo

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

244.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

340.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

 

 

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

115.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

184.00

-12.00

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

175.00

-2.00

Portland

195.00

-

San Francisco

152.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

135.00

-

Los Angeles

179.00

-2.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

105.00

5.00

Chicago

115.00

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

101.50

-8.50

Los Angeles

182.00

-2.00

Memphis

158.00

-2.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

126.75

-10.63

Minneapolis

127.50

2.00

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

114.50

2.00

Minneapolis

115.50

0.37

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

34.50

0.50

Ft. Worth

36.25

1.12

Kansas City

29.75

0.25

Minneapolis

35.00

0.50

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

100.75

0.37

Milwaukee

100.75

0.37

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

32.00

2.25

Minneapolis

32.00

2.25

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

425.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Minneapolis

545.00

-

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

385.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Minneapolis

443.00

-

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

125.00

-

Minneapolis

143.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

85.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Minneapolis

77.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

3.49

-

Portland*

N/A

-

(*per ton)

 

 

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

190.00

-

Freeport

105.00

-

Kansas City

198.00

-12.00

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

146.00

2.00

Stuttgart, Ark.

105.00

-12.50

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

99.00

-

Freeport

40.00

-

Kansas City

133.00

-10.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

40.00

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

75.00

-

Kansas City

105.00

-

DRIED PULP

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Okeechobee

N/A

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

 

 

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

220.00

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Portland

228.00

-

Saginaw

N/A

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls

N/A

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

*bulk, wet

 

 

GRAINS

 

 

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

Portland (ton)

201.50

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

5.30

0.10

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

4.02

-0.05

Delmarva

4.10

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles*

9.97

-0.03

San Fran (rail)*

9.97

-0.03

San Fran

N/A

-

Memphis

4.17

0.13

Minneapolis

3.57

-0.02

Okeechobee

N/A

-

Portland (per

185.75

-0.50

(*per cwt)

 

 

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles*

9.38

-0.03

Memphis

N/A

-

*(per cwt.)

 

 

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per

 

 

Ft.  Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

OTHER

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

151.00

-1.00

San Francisco

128.00

3.00

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

179.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Fayetteville

184.00

-

Memphis

174.00

-

Minneapolis

180.00

-

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas

N/A

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

147.50

-7.50

Kansas City

192.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

202.00

-

New Orleans

145.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

1-22-2020 Ingredient Market

Click "Download" button for a PDF.

Cobb hosts experts at poultry welfare roundtable

Shutterstock chicks in group

Cobb-Vantress Inc. recently hosted a diverse group of animal welfare experts at its global headquarters in Siloam Springs, Ark., to discuss the advancement of flock health and well-being.

The roundtable group — which consisted of poultry science experts from academia, animal welfare officers from global poultry companies and Cobb leaders — focused on advancing poultry welfare awareness and excellence while balancing flock management goals and sustainable production standards in a rapidly changing world. Participants were asked to reflect on and share their perspectives on four key topics: improvements in outcome-based welfare auditing methods, future trends in breed traits and genetics, innovative solutions for employee training and practical ideas to improve the welfare outcomes and daily management of broiler and breeder flocks.

Dr. Kate Barger-Weathers, director of world animal welfare at Cobb-Vantress, organized the annual welfare meeting and led a discussion about the importance of developing and implementing a comprehensive animal welfare program. She highlighted the company’s program, known as CobbCares, and the clear standards and expectations for animal handling and care that have been implemented at Cobb’s farms and hatcheries to ensure the health and well-being of the birds at each stage of development.

She also reviewed the company’s extensive animal welfare training that is required for all Cobb team members — from onboarding and hands-on training for new team members to monthly awareness training for all staff and farmers who work with live poultry to the customized annual training modules that focus on welfare expectations and a practical application of the Five Freedoms.

“We truly care about our chickens,” Barger-Weathers said. “We are constantly striving to make improvements in animal welfare to benefit the chickens we breed, raise and produce for our global customers. We appreciate the insight and feedback that the panel of experts provided to us during this meeting so that we can advance the CobbCares program, Cobb’s focus on poultry behavior and welfare evaluations and welfare outcomes for the global supply chain.”

Dr. Aldo Rossi, vice president of research and development at Cobb-Vantress, provided a detailed overview of the company’s selection program and methods, which include individual bird evaluation and selection based on more than 50 traits, over half of which are associated with health and welfare outcomes.

“Animal welfare is a topic that will continue to evolve as technology, equipment, understanding and poultry breeds advance in providing for the chicken of tomorrow,” Rossi added. “We’re proud to be a part of this roundtable, and we look forward to continued interaction with these partners in the years to come.”

The roundtable meeting concluded with a robust discussion about additional areas that must be considered so supply chain decisions for animal welfare and sustainability are made in a comprehensive and holistic manner.

FDA commissioner urged to uphold dairy terms

Almond milk Mike Mozart FDS.jpg

Sens. Tammy Baldwin (D., Wis.) and Jim Risch (R., Ida.) are leading their colleagues in standing up for America’s dairy farmers in a bipartisan letter to Dr. Stephen Hahn, the new commissioner of the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Working on behalf of dairy farmers in Wisconsin, Idaho and across the country, Baldwin and Risch implored Hahn to work with Congress to combat the misuse of dairy terms on non-dairy products.

“Dairy farmers across our nation work hard to ensure their products are healthy, nutrient dense and in compliance with FDA regulations regarding the use of dairy terms. However, there are many non-dairy imitation products in the marketplace using dairy terms. This represents a clear violation of existing FDA rules,” the senators wrote in their letter. “When non-dairy alternatives use dairy terms to describe their imitation products, the imitators are often assumed to have the same health benefits and nutrient levels as real dairy products. This is both unfair to our hardworking dairy farmers and problematic for consumers, making it harder for Americans to make educated decisions regarding what they feed themselves and their families.”

The letter noted that under former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, "FDA began a process of reviewing how to enforce regulations defining what may be labeled a dairy product. That process included a public comment period that has concluded. Dairy farmers are now waiting for action from FDA. We encourage you to move swiftly to address this unfairness and ensure that dairy terms may only be used to describe products that include dairy. Imposter products should no longer be able to get away with violating law and taking advantage of dairy’s good name.”

In addition to Baldwin and Risch, the letter was also signed by Sens. Mike Crapo (R., Ida.), Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.), Tina Smith (D., Minn.), Susan Collins (R., Maine) and Angus King (I., Maine).

Baldwin and Risch are also lead co-sponsors of the DAIRY PRIDE Act of 2019, which would require non-dairy products made from nuts, seeds, plants and algae to no longer be labeled with dairy terms such as milk, yogurt or cheese. Current FDA regulations define dairy products as being from dairy animals. Although existing federal regulations are clear, FDA has not enforced these labeling regulations, and the mislabeling of products as milk, yogurt and cheese has increased rapidly.

The senators argue that this hurts dairy farmers who work tirelessly to ensure that their dairy products meet FDA standards and provide the public with nutritious food. “It has also led to the proliferation of mislabeled alternative products that contain a range of ingredients and nutrients that are often not equivalent to the nutrition content of dairy products,” they said.