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Georgia Department of Ag introduces new poultry price index

moodboard/Thinkstock raw chicken

In an effort to provide viable price discovery data for use by all parties involved in the production, processing, selling and purchasing of poultry products, the Georgia Department of Agriculture (GDA) introduced this week the new Georgia Premium Poultry Price Index (GPPPI). GDA recently announced it would be introducing a new pricing tool after the validity of the old Georgia Dock Price Index came into question and the agency had to suspend it.  

“As the poultry industry has evolved and adapted to changing production techniques, buying practices and a general increase in demand for the product, the GDA must do the same,” the state agency said on its website. “The GPPPI will include a series of producer price indexes meant to measure the aggregate change in the price of poultry sold on contract over three periods of time. In conjunction, the GDA will report a percent change of sales volume for premium poultry on contract to indicate the weekly change in demand.”

Utilizing the methodology behind the Fisher's Ideal Price Index formula, three producer price indexes will be reported measuring changes in prices at one month, six month and twelve month base periods. Operating under a voluntary reporting structure, GDA said poultry producers will submit every Tuesday information representative of poultry processed in Georgia and sold on contract during the prior week.

GDA said the required information will incorporate a complete list of quantities in pounds and price in cents of all sales of poultry on contract for the prior week. This information will produce a weighted geometric mean price and a total volume of pounds sold. The weighted geometric mean price and total sale volume collected from each company will be used to calculate the three price indexes to be reported each Wednesday. The indexes will measure the aggregate change in prices over each of the prescribed periods.

“By measuring the change in price rather than the price itself, the model is able to reflect a greater variability of products. The model measures the proportional change in price and combines that with the proportional change in price of all other companies resulting in an accurate reflection of the change in poultry prices over the given periods of time.”

The reported information will rely on a set number of commonly produced products; examples include whole bird, boneless skinless breast, bone in breast, wings and leg quarters among others, further processed products such as marinated product should not be included. By limiting the reporting specifically to products that are chicken only, the indexes will not be impacted by increases and decreases in input prices that are not directly related to the production of poultry, GDA noted.

All data provided will be subject to verification through a random review, done through a prescribed process that will confirm submitted prices and quantities with the buyers. All formulas and forms utilized in the calculation of the price indexes will be open source and available to all parties to allow for the opportunity for any individual or company to track their own price indexes in relation to the industry aggregate index. However, GDA said company specific proprietary information will not be available to the public.

“GPPPI provides a useful tool for the poultry marketplace and removes any independent discretion on the reported price for poultry.”

According to GDA, the model is designed to allow producers, processors, sellers and buyers the opportunity to track their specific products and how those products are priced in relation to the industry aggregate index. This will provide the ability for price discovery at any level of the supply chain, for all parties, and will offer a comprehensive view into the price trends of poultry currently in the marketplace, a tool for setting a benchmark price for premium poultry contracts and a viable solution for price discovery for buyers and sellers alike, GDA said.

Corzine ordered to pay $5m in MF Global aftermath

Shutterstock/iStock/Thinkstock Gavel court decision

The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has obtained a federal court Consent Order against Defendant Jon S. Corzine, former CEO of MF Global Inc. (MF Global), requiring him to pay a $5 million civil monetary penalty for his role in MF Global’s unlawful use of customer funds totaling nearly one billion dollars and for his failure to diligently supervise the handling of customer funds. 

Per the Corzine Order, Corzine cannot seek or accept, directly or indirectly, reimbursement or indemnification from any insurance policy with regard to the penalty amount.  The Corzine Order also requires Corzine to undertake that he will never act as a principal, agent, officer, director, or employee of a Futures Commission Merchant (FCM) and that he will never register with the CFTC in any capacity. 

As to Defendant Edith O’Brien, the former assistant treasurer of MF Global, the Court entered an Order (O’Brien Order) requiring her to pay a $500,000 civil monetary penalty for aiding and abetting MF Global’s violations and prevents her from associating with an FCM or registering with the CFTC in any capacity for a period of eighteen (18) months.

Previously, the CFTC ‎obtained Orders against MF Global and its parent company MF Global Holdings Ltd., which Orders required restitution in amounts sufficient to pay all customer claims.

The Orders against Corzine and O’Brien were entered on January 5, 2017, by Judge Victor Marrero of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.   

Aitan Goelman, the CFTC’s enforcement director, stated: “This resolution demonstrates the importance that the Commission attaches to customer protection, which has long been a hallmark of our mission.” 

The Orders arise out of the CFTC’s amended Complaint, filed on December 6, 2013.  The Corzine Order finds that Corzine was the CEO of MF Global from September 1, 2010 through the commencement of its liquidation proceedings on October 31, 2011 as well as the CEO and Chairman of the Board of Directors of its parent company Holdings.  The O’Brien Order finds that she supervised MF Global’s Treasury Department, which handled the cash management of MF Global, and was responsible for directing, approving, and/or causing certain wire transfers and other payments into and out of MF Global’s customer accounts. 

Both Orders find that, during the last week of October 2011, in violation of U.S. commodity laws, MF Global unlawfully used nearly one billion dollars of customer segregated funds to support its own proprietary operations and the operations of its affiliates and to pay broker-dealer securities customers and pay FCM customers for withdrawals of secured customer funds. 

The Orders find that MF Global violated the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) and CFTC Regulations by failing to treat, deal with, and account for its FCM customers’ segregated funds as belonging to such customers; failing to account separately for, properly segregate, and treat its FCM customers’ segregated funds as belonging to such customers; commingling its FCM customers’ segregated funds with the funds of any other person; using its FCM customers’ segregated funds to fund the operations of MF Global and its affiliates, thereby using or permitting the use of the funds of one futures customer for the benefit of a person other than such futures customer; and withdrawing from its FCM customer segregated funds beyond MF Global’s actual interest therein. 

When the transfers occurred, Corzine controlled MF Global, which was experiencing a worsening liquidity crisis.  Because of this control and by his conduct, Corzine is liable for MF Global’s violations as its controlling person.  Furthermore, from at least August 2011 through October 31, 2011, Corzine failed to supervise diligently the activities of the officers, employees, and agents of MF Global in their handling of customer funds.  By this conduct, Corzine violated CFTC Regulation 166.3, 17 C.F.R. § 166.3.

The O’Brien Order finds that O’Brien, knowing that certain funds would be transferred from customer segregated accounts to MF Global’s proprietary accounts, on Thursday, October 27, 2011 and Friday, October 28, 2011, directed, approved, and/or caused seven transfers of funds from customer segregated accounts to MF Global’s proprietary accounts totaling hundreds of millions of dollars – more than MF Global had in excess segregated funds as last reported to O’Brien – that caused and/or contributed to a deficiency in the customer segregated accounts. By this conduct, O’Brien aided and abetted MF Global’s segregation violations.

The CFTC previously settled charges against MF Global and its parent Holdings for their violations of the CEA and CFTC Regulations.  On November 8, 2013, the CFTC obtained a federal Consent Order against MF Global for misuse of customer funds and related supervisory failures in violation of the CEA and CFTC Regulations. 

MF Global was required to pay $1.212 billion in restitution to its customers, as well as a $100 million civil monetary penalty.  On December 23, 2014, the CFTC obtained a federal court Consent Order against Holdings also requiring it to pay $1.212 billion in restitution, joint and several with MF Global, and imposed a $100 million penalty (see CFTC Order and Press Release 7095-14, December 24, 2014).

Pursuant to these Orders against MF Global and Holdings, restitution has been paid to satisfy all customer claims, the CFTC said.

 

 

USDA eases transfer of land to beginning farmers

USDA CRP grassway field

Agriculture Deputy Under Secretary Lanon Baccam announced that beginning Jan. 9, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will offer an early termination opportunity for certain Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts, making it easier to transfer property to the next generation of farmers and ranchers, including family members. The land that is eligible for the early termination is among the least environmentally sensitive land enrolled in CRP. 

This change to the CRP program is just one of many that USDA has implemented based on recommendations from the Land Tenure Advisory Subcommittee formed by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in 2015. The subcommittee was asked to identify ways the department could use or modify its programs, regulations and practices to address the challenges of beginning farmers and ranchers in their access to land, capital and technical assistance. 

“The average age of principal farm operators is 58,” said Baccam. “So, land tenure, succession and estate planning, and access to land is an increasingly important issue for the future of agriculture and a priority for USDA. Access to land remains the biggest barrier for beginning farmers and ranchers. This announcement is part of our efforts to address some of the challenges with transitioning land to beginning farmers.” 

Baccam made the announcement while touring the Joe Dunn farm in Warren County, located in central Iowa near Carlisle. Dunn is the father-in-law to Iowa native and former Marine Aaron White, who with his wife, are prospective candidates for the early termination program. Baccam was joined by Farm Service Agency Iowa State Executive Director John Whitaker when meeting with Dunn and White. 

“The chance to give young farmers a better opportunity to succeed when starting a farming career makes perfect sense,” said Baccam. “There are Conservation Reserve Program acres that are rested and ready to be productive, an original goal of CRP. The technical teams at USDA will tell us which ones can terminate from the program with little impact on the overall conservation efforts. When they do, we’ll be ready to help beginning farmers like military veteran Aaron White.” 

Normally if a landowner terminates a CRP contract early, they are required to repay all previous payments plus interest. The new policy waives this repayment if the land is transferred to a beginning farmer or rancher through a sale or lease with an option to buy. With CRP enrollment close to the Congressionally-mandated cap of 24 million acres, the early termination will also allow USDA to enroll other land with higher conservation value elsewhere. 

“Starting the next generation of farmers and ranchers out with conservation and stewardship in mind is another important part of this announcement,” Baccam said. “The land coming out of CRP will have priority enrollment opportunities with USDA’s working lands conservation programs through cooperation between the Farm Service Agency and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.” 

Acres terminated early from CRP under these land tenure provisions will be eligible for priority enrollment consideration into the CRP Grasslands, if eligible; or the Conservation Stewardship Program or Environmental Quality Incentives Program, as determined by the Natural Resources Conservation Service. 

According to the Tenure, Ownership and Transition of Agricultural Land survey, conducted by USDA in 2014, U.S. farmland owners expect to transfer 93 million acres to new ownership during 2015-2019. This represents 10% of all farmland across the nation.

Details on the early termination opportunity will be available starting on Jan. 9, 2017, at local USDA service centers. For more information about CRP and to find out if your acreage is eligible for early contract termination, contact your local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office or go online at www.fsa.usda.gov/crp. To locate your local FSA office, visit http://offices.usda.gov/

 

South American demand boosts Monsanto quarterly results

Monsanto Company delivered during Q1 2017 higher earnings per share (EPS) than the prior year thanks to the strength of the company’s South American business. In 2017, the company said it remains focused on delivering on its operational plan and key business milestones while simultaneously working with Bayer on the necessary steps to finalize the deal to merge the companies, which is targeted for the end of calendar year 2017. Additionally, in its annual research-and-development update, the company highlighted more than 20 phase advancements across the industry’s broadest pipeline.

 

“We’ve been very pleased with the strong support - especially from shareowners and growers - for the agreement to combine with Bayer,” said Hugh Grant, chairman and chief executive officer. “We expect the combination with Bayer to amplify the rate of innovation faster than either company could achieve alone, which will be critical in helping to increase grower productivity to meet projected demand in the decades ahead.”

 

Regarding this year’s annual pipeline update, Robb Fraley, Ph.D., executive vice president and chief technology officer, said the last several years brought record-breaking achievements for the company’s pipeline, with this year being no different. “To answer the challenges growers face, our teams have been successful in finding the best scientific disciplines for the job - whether it’s breeding, biotech, crop protection, biologicals or Climate FieldView products. And with Bayer, we truly see the opportunity to accelerate innovation, optimize integrated solutions and expand offerings - translating to significant benefits for farmers.”

 

Results of operations

 

Net sales for the fiscal year 2017 first quarter increased over the prior year’s first quarter to $2.7 billion versus $2.2 billion in the prior year period. Gross profit for the quarter increased to $1.3 billion versus the prior year period of $0.9 billion.

 

Selling, general and administrative costs were $585 million and research and development expenses were $370 million for the first quarter of fiscal year 2017. Total operating spend decreased with reduced restructuring expenses more than offsetting increases from pending Bayer transaction related costs, growth in commissions in South America and unfavorable impact of currency on spend.

 

The company’s fiscal year 2017 first quarter EPS on an as-reported basis was $0.07 which included $0.19 of pending Bayer transaction related costs. EPS on an ongoing basis was $0.21, well above the prior year’s ongoing loss of $0.11, driven by the expected strong start to the business in South America and currency effects.

 

Fiscal Year 2017 outlook

 

With the expected strong start in the first quarter and continued focus on return on innovation and financial discipline, the company remains confident in its fiscal year 2017 outlook. Despite the fact that the year-over-year change in currency rates was modestly favorable in the first quarter of fiscal year 2017, the company continues to assume that the change in rates will have a relatively neutral effect on a full year basis given the recent strengthening of the U.S. dollar against several currencies.

 

The fiscal year 2017 full-year as-reported EPS guidance is expected to be in the range of $3.97-4.45. These earnings are expected to translate into $2.4-to-$2.8 billion of operating cash flows and $1.4-1.6 billion of free cash flows, after deducting an estimated $1.0-1.2 billion of investing cash flows. These investing cash flows reflect the planned investment in the company’s dicamba manufacturing facility and assume the successful sale of the precision agriculture equipment business, the company said. On an ongoing basis, the fiscal year 2017 EPS is expected to be in the range of $4.50-4.90, reflecting expected growth for the year.

 

The company’s restructuring and cost savings initiatives remain on track, with the opportunity to deliver approximately $380 million in annual savings at the close of fiscal 2017 in operating expenses and cost of good sold, as compared to fiscal year 2015. However, setting aside pending Bayer transaction related costs and restructuring expenses, overall operating expenses in fiscal 2017 are expected to increase slightly with inflation and the costs associated with the return to growth of the business more than offsetting the savings.

 

For the second quarter of fiscal year 2017, the company expects as-reported and ongoing earnings per share that is approximately $0.20 to $0.50 better than the prior year. The company sees this first half earnings improvement as a reflection of the benefit from the sale of the Latitude business and the absence of a significant portion of the Argentine peso devaluation from the prior year. In the second half of the fiscal year, the company expects roughly 40 cents less in earnings per share benefit from strategic deals versus the prior year in addition to a more challenging currency environment than in the first quarter.

 

The Seeds and Genomics segment consists of the global seeds and related traits business, biotechnology platforms and digital agriculture.

 

Net sales for the Seeds and Genomics segment in the first three months of fiscal 2017 were $1.8 billion. This included a greater than 25% increase in planted corn acres in Argentina and more than a 10% increase in corn acres planted in Brazil accompanied by double-digit price increases in corn germplasm in local currency in both countries. In the U.S., demand for year-one hybrids remains strong and the early read on the order book supports the company’s intention to grow genetic share.

 

The company said it continues to build on the momentum of Intacta RR2 PRO soybeans in South America as it remains on track to reach a target of 45 to 55 million acres in fiscal year 2017. In the U.S., demand for Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybeans remains strong and the company is well-supplied for more than 15 million acres of the product, it added.

 

With the EPA approval for in-crop use of dicamba in-hand, the company has received nearly two-thirds of the necessary state approvals for both soybeans and cotton, and expects to have the rest before planting.

 

Moving beyond seeds, Monsanto said it continues to see major advancements in its Climate FieldView platform as the business and platform continues to evolve. The company recently released four new product enhancements for 2017 and these upgrades, together with outstanding demand for FieldView Drive and FieldView Plus, set the company up to reach its goal of 25 million paid acres. Simultaneously, the company expects to add several more partners to the platform in the coming year.

 

The Agricultural Productivity segment consists of the crop protection products and lawn-and-garden herbicide products.

 

Though glyphosate volumes were up in the first quarter, net sales for the Agricultural Productivity segment in the first three months of fiscal 2017 were $802 million, down from $820 million in Q1 2016, reflecting glyphosate pricing headwinds that are expected to continue into the second quarter as the current global pricing is lower than the prior comparable period. As a partial offset to EBIT, the company recently signed an agreement to sell its Latitude wheat fungicide business for $140 million and expects to receive an EBIT benefit of approximately $85 million in this segment in the second quarter.

 

Moving beyond the first quarter, the company said it continues to focus on the launch of Xtendimax herbicide with VaporGrip Technology.

Obama land grab causes concern

Bears Ears final map monument designation

Just a few days after Christmas, local landowners in the West got coal in their stockings when the Obama Administration declared two new monument designations - 1.35 million acres at Bears Ears in Utah and 350,000 acres at Gold Butte in Nevada. Both designations were made “unilaterally and despite overwhelming local opposition,” the Public Lands Council (PLC) said.

The designations of the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah and the Gold Butte National Monument in Nevada make it the 29th time President Obama has used his executive power under the Antiquities Act, more than any other president before him.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said, “As we move forward with planning for monument implementation, the deep knowledge of the tribal community as well as ranchers, recreationists, archeologists and local community citizens will be heard.”

In July, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, Agriculture undersecretary for natural resources and environment Robert Bonnie and other senior Administration officials visited Bears Ears along with staff from Gov. Herbert’s office and Utah congressional delegation staff, and attended a public meeting where the majority of an overflow crowd encouraged permanent protection for this iconic landscape, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

However, those opposed to the designation tell a different story. PLC president and Utah rancher Dave Eliason criticized the outgoing Administration for both its disregard for local input and the manner in which these latest designations were executed.  

“Designating a monument in this manner – under the cloak of darkness and without even the decency of notifying the local communities, the states or the congressional delegations of Utah or Nevada – speaks volumes about the disregard this Administration has for local input,” Eliason said. “If the Administration was proud of this action, they would have touted it proudly yesterday when the designation was made. Instead, the Administration hid out while no one impacted by this monument was given the courtesy of a simple phone call until a full day after the papers were signed."

In a statement from USDA regarding the announcement, the agency said the area’s tradition of ranching, which dates back to the late 1800s, will continue. Grazing permits and leases will continue to be issued by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service.

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However, in a letter to the new Administration, PLC and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Assn. (NCBA) said ranchers and other multiple-use interests in the West have been “subjected to an almost wholesale shift in federal land management policy under the Obama administration.”

Eliason said, “While the Bureau of Land Management has a clear directive to manage BLM lands for multiple use and sustained yield, instead focus has shifted toward ‘conservation’ without responsible management.”

“Ranchers that operate on federal lands protect water sources used by livestock and wildlife, maintain fence lines, reduce spread of invasive weeds like cheatgrass and medusahead, and decrease the fuel loads that lead to catastrophic wildfire,” said Tracy Brunner, NCBA president. “Despite these contributions, beneficiaries of our work continue to attack responsible grazing, essentially biting the hand that feeds them. It is time these groups – whether they be wildlife advocates, environmental organizations, or recreational interests like hikers and sportsmen – put politics aside and appreciate the hard work required to provide them with the quality outdoor experiences they all cherish.”

PLC, NCBA, the American Sheep Industry Assn. and the Association of National Grasslands as well as the associated western affiliates, urged the incoming Trump Administration to reevaluate the flawed policies driven by radical special-interest groups and take advantage of the tremendous benefits and opportunities available through restoration and enhancement of responsible grazing on federal lands.

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R., Utah) called the designation an “egregious abuse of executive power” and criticized the President for caring more about “far-left special interest groups” than those who live in Utah. Hatch said he plans to meet with Interior Secretary nominee Ryan Zinke to discuss the prospects of reversing the designation, and he said that conversation would largely determine his support for Zinke’s confirmation.

Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes also said the his office is working closely with the governor’s office, federal and state legislators and San Juan County to file a lawsuit challenging “this egregious overreach by the Obama Administration.” Reyes said the case is different from other past challenges by states and counties and “we are confident in our chances of success.”

Ingredient market prices, 12/28/16

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The following prices, which include delivery, were obtained Dec. 28from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. The prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. Second column shows the amount of change since the previous week. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used. U.S. short tons, 2,000 lb. N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available.

OILSEED PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

377.00

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

327.00

8.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

387.00

-

Ft. Worth

352.00

7.00

Kansas City

270.00

-25.00

Los Angeles

348.00

6.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

292.00

6.00

Okeechobee

377.00

-

Portland

348.90

-

San Francisco

348.00

6.00

Twin Falls

360.00

-1.00

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

367.00

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

315.00

8.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

377.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

270.00

-25.00

Los Angeles

328.00

6.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

367.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

328.00

6.00

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

200.00

-

Buffalo*

N/A

-

Chicago

130.00

-

Fayetteville, NC

220.00

-

Ft. Worth*

105.00

-25.00

Los Angeles

148.00

-

Minneapolis

100.00

-

Okeechobee

200.00

-

San Francisco

148.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

* unpelleted

 

 

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

200.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

233.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

200.00

-

Ft. Worth

240.00

-

Los Angeles

308.00

2.00

Lubbock

205.00

-

Memphis

200.00

-

Okeechobee

217.00

-

Portland

330.00

-

San Francisco

308.00

2.00

Twin Falls

305.00

-5.00

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

325.00

-

Chicago

258.00

-

Delmarva

325.00

-

Fayetteville NC

325.00

-

Ft. Worth

275.00

-

Kansas City

290.00

25.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

245.00

-

Memphis

215.00

-

Okeechobee

335.00

-

San Francisco

228.00

-1.00

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

325.00

-

Chicago

175.00

-

Fayetteville NC

325.00

-

Ft. Worth

115.00

-

Okeechobee

362.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

80.00

-

San Francisco

215.00

7.00

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

230.10

10.60

Los Angeles

235.00

-

Montreal

248.00

5.00

Portland

239.40

-

San Francisco

235.00

-

Twin Falls

240.00

-4.00

Vancouver

200.00

-

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

150.00

-

Minneapolis

150.00

-

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

345.00

-

Fargo

270.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

306.00

-

Kansas City

235.00

-

Minneapolis

320.00

-

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

138.00

-

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

238.00

-

Delmarva

345.00

-

Fayetteville NC

280.00

10.00

Ft. Worth

240.00

10.00

Kansas City

200.00

-10.00

Los Angeles

260.00

-

Memphis

270.00

10.00

Minneapolis

260.00

-

Portland

245.00

-

San Francisco

260.00

-

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

330.00

20.00

Los Angeles

300.40

-

Memphis

320.00

20.00

Minneapolis

295.00

20.00

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

900.00

25.00

Los Angeles

950.00

-

Memphis

875.00

25.00

Minneapolis

900.00

50.00

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

925.00

25.00

Memphis

900.00

25.00

Minneapolis

975.00

75.00

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

300.00

10.00

Ft. Worth

230.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

369.00

-

Memphis

300.00

10.00

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

650.00

25.00

Fayetteville NC

650.00

25.00

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Delmarva

390.00

5.00

Fayetteville NC

360.00

10.00

Ft. Worth

440.00

-

Kansas City

470.00

5.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

360.00

10.00

Minneapolis

425.00

25.00

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1450.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1350.00

-

Minneapolis

1535.00

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

 

 

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

28.50

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

24.38

-

San Francisco

23.38

-

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

24.00

-

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

24.00

-

Ft. Worth

25.50

2.00

Kansas City

25.50

-

Los Angeles

23.38

-

Memphis

24.00

-

Minneapolis

22.00

-

San Francisco

22.38

-

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

27.00

-

Minneapolis

26.00

-

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

29.00

-

Ft. Worth

31.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

30.50

-0.50

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

26.00

1.00

Los Angeles

22.88

-

Minneapolis

23.00

-0.50

San Francisco

22.88

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

22.50

-

Fayetteville NC

23.00

-

Memphis

23.00

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

30.00

-

Fayetteville NC

30.00

-

GLUTEN, HOMINY

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

523.00

5.00

Kansas City

555.00

10.00

Los Angeles

550.00

-

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

106.00

2.00

Fayetteville NC

130.00

-

Kansas City

160.00

20.00

Okeechobee

150.00

-

Twin Falls

178.00

3.00

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

205.00

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

103.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

105.00

-

Los Angeles

164.00

2.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

164.00

2.00

Twin Falls

167.00

-4.00

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

120.00

-

Milwaukee

95.00

-

Winona, Minn

95.00

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

178.00

-

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

110.00

-

Fayetteville NC

178.00

-

Kansas City

150.00

20.00

Los Angeles

165.00

2.00

Minneapolis

95.00

5.00

Okeechobee

188.00

-

Portland

166.50

-

San Francisco

165.00

2.00

Twin Falls

175.00

1.00

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.75

-

Milwaukee

0.75

-

Minneapolis

0.75

-

ALFALFA

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Central Neb.

235.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

310.00

-

Kansas City

240.00

20.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

245.00

-

Toledo

315.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

180.00

-

Kansas City

190.00

15.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

200.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

 

 

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

95.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

138.00

-1.00

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

129.00

-1.00

Portland

140.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

115.00

-

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

115.00

-

Los Angeles

134.00

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

85.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

160.00

-

Kansas City

100.00

-

Los Angeles

136.00

-1.00

Memphis

165.00

5.00

Minneapolis

92.00

2.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

100.00

0.50

Minneapolis

100.00

0.50

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

96.00

1.50

Minneapolis

96.00

1.50

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

38.90

0.20

Ft. Worth

39.00

0.63

Kansas City

27.50

0.50

Minneapolis

39.00

0.13

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

88.25

-

Milwaukee

88.25

-

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

37.00

-

Minneapolis

37.00

-

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

410.00

-

Kansas City

345.00

-

Minneapolis

577.00

-

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

380.00

-

Kansas City

280.00

5.00

Minneapolis

417.00

-

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

120.00

-

Minneapolis

138.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

60.00

-

Kansas City

30.00

-

Minneapolis

72.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

2.83

-

Portland*

210.00

-

(*per ton)

 

 

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

150.00

-3.00

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

130.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

120.00

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

95.00

-5.00

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

106.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

60.00

-3.00

Kansas City

60.00

-

DRIED PULP

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

185.00

-

Fayetteville NC

195.00

-

Okeechobee

160.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

 

 

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

150.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

440.00

-

Minneapolis

120.00

-

Portland

155.00

-

Saginaw

140.00

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls (sacked)

355.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

*bulk, wet

 

 

GRAINS

 

 

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City (bu.)

4.40

0.05

Los Angeles (cwt)

8.65

0.15

Portland (ton)

160.00

-

San Francisco (cwt)

8.65

0.15

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC (bu.)

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

3.47

0.05

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

5.17

-0.12

Boston

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

3.61

0.08

Delmarva

3.70

-0.42

Fayetteville NC

5.17

-0.12

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.33

0.01

Los Angeles*

8.72

0.07

San Fran (rail)*

8.72

0.07

San Fran (truck)*

N/A

-

Memphis

3.63

0.07

Minneapolis

2.98

-

Okeechobee

5.40

-0.12

Portland (per ton)

162.50

-

(*per cwt)

 

 

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

3.18

0.02

Kansas City

2.83

-0.04

Los Angeles*

8.21

0.06

Memphis

N/A

-

*(per cwt.)

 

 

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

  1. Worth

428.00

-

Kansas City

50.00

-

OTHER

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

95.00

-

San Francisco

73.00

-

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

165.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

170.00

-

Memphis

160.00

-

Minneapolis

152.00

-

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas City

58.00

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

130.00

-

Kansas City

167.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

177.50

-

New Orleans

132.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

LIVESTOCK MARKETS: More pork, higher hog prices ahead?

Scott Olson_Getty Images News hogs huddled together at hog farm

The most recent U.S. Department of Agriculture “Hogs and Pigs” report indicated pork supplies in 2017 would likely be larger than pre-report expectations. 

Purdue University livestock economist Chris Hurt said slaughter numbers have run high all fall and USDA revised upward the size of the spring 2016 pig crop by 2.5% to account for the heavier runs. In a similar fashion, the December survey also found more market hogs. The number of pigs that weighed less than 180 lb. was 4% larger than the inventory of a year ago and 2% larger than pre-report trade estimates. These will be the market hogs arriving at processing plants from January to May 2017, Hurt noted. 

A similar story unfolded for the breeding herd, which was 1.5% higher and 1% more than pre-report estimates. Farrowing intentions were also above expectations. Winter farrowing intentions were 1.4% higher and spring farrowing intentions were 1% higher. Hurt said the expansion of the breeding herd has tended to follow the record corn yields, with the Illinois, Missouri and North Dakota breeding herds up 10% and the South Dakota up 9%.

According to Hurt, the number of pigs per litter continued to march higher in 2016 with new records in each quarter. The last quarter of 2016 attained the highest level ever at 10.63 pigs per litter. For 2016, the new annual record was 10.5 pigs. Hurt said the average rate of annual increase over the past 10 years has been 1.5%.

Given these numbers, Hurt said the industry will increase pork output by about 3% in 2017 to 25.7 billion lb., a 12% increase since 2014 when porcine epidemic diarrhea reduced production and contributed to record high hog prices. He forecasted pork production will rise by 2% the first-half of 2017 and by about 4% in the last-half. 

“Hog prices were extremely depressed in the final quarter of 2016 when live prices averaged about $37/cwt. That was the lowest quarterly price since 2003,” said Hurt, adding that the lowest prices were in mid-November, touching the extremely low $30s. “Recovery came quickly with prices rising to the lower $40s by the end of the year. For all of 2016 live hog prices averaged about $46.”

As for prices in 2017, Hurt said 3% higher production might mean annual prices will be lower. However, he said there are additional items to consider.

First, retail prices did drop in 2016, but there is opportunity for those prices to come down more. “Lower retail prices will stimulate the quantity of pork that consumers purchase.”

Second, Hurt said USDA expects exports to expand by 5%, which will move more of the increased production to foreign customers.

Third, with the addition of new processing capacity, the farm-to-wholesale margins are expected to drop, Hurt said. “Lower margins at the processing stage may contribute to stronger bids to hog producers.”

Live hog prices are expected to be about $48/cwt. in 2017, a $2 increase from 2016. Prices by quarter are expected to average $45/cwt. in the first quarter, the very-low $50s in the second and the third quarters, and then $43 in the final quarter of 2017. A range of $2 higher or lower would be reasonable for price projections, Hurt added.

Costs of production are expected to be around $50 on a live weight basis in both 2016 and 2017 based on current feed price expectations. Hurt pointed out that this means the industry operated at an estimated loss of about $12 per head in 2016 and is expected to have losses that average about $6 per head in 2017.

“Losses in the first quarter of 2017 are expected to be about $13 dollars per head. Modest profits may return in the second and third quarters, with a return to the largest losses of the year in the final quarter,” he said.

Because the 2017 outlook is for weak returns, Hurt said it is important to keep further expansion to a minimum. “This will be difficult with new processing capacity coming in 2017 as those plants will want to stimulate some added production to fill their lines.” 

Pork exports to China will particularly bear watching in 2017, Hurt said. Last year, exports to China nearly doubled growing to near 16% of total exports.

Trade positions of the Trump Administration will also be of deep interest to the pork industry in 2017. Mexico became the number one destination for U.S. pork in 2015 and 2016, which Hurt said means trade relations with Mexico will need to be watched carefully for potential impacts on the hog market.

“Remember that a breeding herd that stays the same size will still enable a 1-2% expansion of pork production due to more pigs per litter and higher market weights. A 2% production growth rate is probably close to what is sustainable with modest U.S. population growth and some growth in exports,” he said.

Market recap

The December fed cattle future market was mostly lower this week after a long holiday weekend. Nearby contracts closed lower Tuesday at $114.875/cwt., posted gains Wednesday, but closed lower again Thursday at $115.075/cwt.

January feeder cattle futures were lower this week. Nearby contracts closed lower Tuesday and Thursday at $130.20/cwt. and $128.25/cwt.

For the beef cutouts this week, Choice and Select were lower at $201.52/cwt. and $193.39/cwt., respectively.

February lean hog futures started the week lower but climbed through the week. Nearby contracts closed lower Tuesday at $63.50/cwt. but closed higher Thursday at $64.875/cwt.

Pork cutout values were higher this week. The wholesale pork cutout was higher at $79.57/cwt. Loins were higher at $80.75/cwt. Hams and bellies were also higher at $62.02/cwt. and $118.16/cwt.

Hogs delivered to the western Corn Belt were higher this week, closing at $54.08/cwt. on Thursday.

USDA reported the Eastern Region whole broiler/fryer weighted average price at 85.54 cents/lb. on Dec. 30.

According to USDA, egg prices have been steady, with a lower to sharply lower undertone. Offerings and supplies have been moderate to heavy. Demand has been mostly light to moderate.

Large eggs delivered to the Northeast were unchanged at $1.10-1.14/doz. Prices in the Southeast and Midwest were higher at $1.21-1.24/doz. and $1.10-1.13/doz., respectively. Large eggs delivered to California were unchanged at $1.66/doz.

For turkeys, USDA said the market was steady to weak, with light to moderate offerings. Demand has been light. Prices were lower, at $1.00-1.02/lb. for both hens and toms.

University transportation center awarded $1.4m

Heather Nachtmann tugboat and barge
A tugboat and barge in the McClellan–Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System.

With a new $1.4 million award from the U.S. Department of Transportation, researchers at the University of Arkansas and their collaborators at five other institutions have renewed the status of the Maritime Transportation Research & Education Center (MarTREC) as a Tier 1 University Transportation Center.

The center, led by the University of Arkansas, is a consortium of researchers from Jackson State University in Mississippi, Louisiana State University, the University of New Orleans, Vanderbilt University in Tennessee and Texas A&M University. The consortium’s researchers are nationally recognized experts in maritime and multimodal logistics, which integrates trucking, rail and barge carriers.

In 2014, total waterborne commerce in the U.S. equated to 2.346 billion tons, or 40% of domestic cargo, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

“Research shows the use of navigation channels helped to avoid 58 million truck trips that would have doubled the number of trucks on the road,” said Heather Nachtmann, director of the center and a professor of industrial engineering at the University of Arkansas.

Other reports predict that imports and exports will double over the next 30 years, leading to greater congestion at U.S. coastal ports, which currently handle 75% of international trade volume.

“Given the link between international trade and gross domestic product, efficient and resilient ports are critical to the nation’s overall economy and the abilities of intermodal carriers to move freight between ports of entry and inland locations,” Nachtmann said.

Nationwide, MarTREC is one of 20 centers designated as Tier 1, which refers to the level of grant funding from DOT.

The center’s researchers focus on preserving the existing U.S. transportation system by conducting a multidisciplinary program of maritime and multimodal transportation research, education and technology transfer. The new award is part of an anticipated five-year program that will total up to $7 million in federal funding and $3.5 million in matching funds.

The new funding will allow MarTREC researchers to continue working on the design of supply chain networks to optimize resources and minimize congestion on navigable waterways. The research focuses on efficient design and planning for barge containers, shipping cycle times, reliability, safety and environmental preservation. The funding will support optimization of routes to relieve congestion and reduce demand on ports, highways and rail systems. Researchers will also assess the impact of new global shipping routes, including expanded use of the Panama Canal, on the U.S. transportation system.

GRAIN MARKETS: Surge puts soybean market back above $10

Soybeans closed with double-digit gains and above $10/bu. in several months on bargain buying that may have been triggered by talk of flooding in Argentina's Santa Fe province.

Winter wheat had solid gains a day after Kansas and Oklahoma reported significant drops in crop conditions following cold, dry conditions in December.

Corn finished about 4 cents/bu. higher and largely followed soybeans and wheat.

The lower dollar may have helped. The currency corrected after running up to a 14-year high on Tuesday.

Exports, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Reuters, included the following highlights:

- Morocco seeks to buy 363,636 metric tons of U.S. soft wheat and a similar amount of European Union soft wheat. It also seeks to buy 327,273 mt of U.S. durum. The deadline for the U.S. wheat is Jan. 17, with the soft wheat for arrival by April 30 and the durum by Dec. 31.

- Algeria seeks to buy at least 50,000 mt of wheat for March shipment. Offers are due by Jan. 5.

- Taiwan's MFIG group seeks to buy up to 65,000 mt of corn, which can be sourced from the U.S., Argentina, Brazil or South Africa. The tender closes on Thursday, with shipment for March 17-Aprl 5.

- Ethiopia seeks to buy 720,000 mt of optional-origin milling wheat, with offers due by Feb. 3. Shipment will be within three months of when letters of credit are opened, which could be March to May.

In other markets, the Dow Jones industrials were about 60 points higher when the crops closed but remained below 20,000. Crude oil was up about 80 cents a barrel.

 

Corn closed about 4 cents higher, above a few key moving averages and at a two-week high. The March contract is at the upper end of a 15-cent trading range that goes back to October.

Last year's big U.S. harvest plus ample world supplies have limited upside price moves. Argentina and Brazil will be harvesting corn in about a month, with Argentina expecting a big crop this year.

USDA on Tuesday reported that 451.9 million bu. of corn were used for ethanol in November versus 433.9 million bu. a year ago.

Corn at China's Dalian market for January was flat, at the equivalent of $5.47/bu. European corn for January was at $4.64. The prices reflect conversions from local currencies and metric tons.

The Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) estimated Wednesday's corn volume at 259,752, compared with Tuesday's actual volume of 253,886. Open interest on Tuesday increased by 7,117 in the higher market, with March up 3,568 and May up 1,465.

March corn closed 4 cents higher at $3.5975/bu., and May was up 4.25 cents to $3.6575/bu.

What to look for: Weather reports from South America continue to move the corn and soybean markets. Currently, the rain in Argentina could become a supportive factor instead of a bearish one if the flooding continues. USDA's next crop report is due Jan. 12 and will have the government's production estimates for 2016 crops.

 

Soybeans charged higher on light bargain hunting amid talk of the flooding in Argentina and more rain in the forecast. It may be too early to assess the impact of flooding on the Argentina crop, but traders appeared anxious to buy after Tuesday's break to a six-week low.

More deliveries were posted against the CBOT January contracts, with 500 soybean contracts posted, 150 for soybean meal and 727 for soybean oil.

U.S. soybean oil for January closed 0.41 cent higher to 34.98 cents/lb. Malaysian palm oil futures were lower, with January at the equivalent of 32.63 cents/lb.

CBOT estimated Wednesday's volume at 148,540, compared with Tuesday's actual volume of 139,400. On Tuesday, open interest in the lower market was down 736 contracts, with January down 1,901 and March down 885.

January soybeans closed 19.5 cents higher at $10.0625/bu., and March was up 20.25 cents at $10.1525/bu. New-crop November rose 15.5 cents to $9.9875/bu.

What to look for: Brazil's soybean harvest got an early start in late December but will gain traction in January, with a big production number expected.

 

Winter wheat charged higher after late-Tuesday reports rated 44% of the Kansas wheat in good to excellent condition, compared with 52% at the end of November.

In addition, the best of Oklahoma's wheat was 25% good and 50% fair, which compared with November's 7% excellent, 46% good and 35% fair.

Snow was headed for Nebraska on Wednesday and then should move south into Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle on Thursday, which may provide wheat with some insulating cover. The 6- to 10-day outlook favors mild temperatures for the central and southern Plains but not a lot of moisture.

CBOT estimated Wednesday's soft red winter wheat volume at 87,410, compared with Tuesday's actual volume of 105,820. Open interest in Tuesday's lower market was up 6,949, with March up 2,458 and May up 2,886.

Chicago, Ill., soft red winter wheat closed 12 cents higher for March at $4.185/bu. and 11.25 cents higher for May at $4.2925/bu. Kansas City, Mo., hard red winter rose 12.5 cents -- to $4.265/bu. for March and to $4.38/bu. for May. Spring wheat rose 7 cents to $5.445/bu. for March and was up 6.25 cents at $5.405/bu. for May.

What to look for. While it is believed that the dollar's recent run to nearly a 14-year high would make it hard for U.S. wheat to compete in export markets, yearly exports have done well. USDA's latest report shows year-to-date sales up 32% from a year ago, with hard red winter wheat accounting for the largest share of that increase.

Names in the News: January 2017

U.S. MEAT EXPORT FEDERATION, Denver, Colo. – Dr. Oscar Ferrara has joined the federation as regional director for Mexico, Central America and the Dominican Republic. Ferrara will work to expand demand for U.S. beef, pork and lamb in the region. He was previously with the Foreign Agricultural Service Office of Agreements & Scientific Affairs. 

 

COLORADO PREMIUM, Greeley, Colo. – Mark Gustafson has joined the company as director of international sales. Gustafson will lead the expansion of the export division. He was previously with JBS USA.

 

AVIAN TECHNOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, Gainesville, Ga. – Jason Kempker has been named chief executive officer. Kempker will oversee daily operations. He most recently specialized in hatching egg sales and breeder sales.

 

BIOZYME INC., St. Joseph, Mo. – Rowdy Pope has joined the company as area sales manager in the supplement division. Pope will be responsible for promoting product sales and supporting the dealer network in Florida, Alabama and Georgia. He was previously with the U.S. Department of Justice.

 

GREAT PLAINS PROCESSING, Luverne, Minn.Curt Beyer has joined the company as vice president of sales. Beyer will provide technical direction for product development and will lead strategic marketing and sales efforts. He was previously with Trouw Nutrition USA.

 

CEVA ANIMAL HEALTH LLC, Lenexa, Kan. – Matt Kocher has joined the company as director, marketing, for poultry and swine. Kocher was previously with Elanco Animal Health.

 

BIORIGIN, Sao Paulo, Brazil – Rodrigo Gardinal has joined the company as technical specialist in the animal nutrition segment. Gardinal will be responsible for the research and development interface, for relations with universities and research institutions and for providing technical support to the sales and technical marketing teams, with a focus on ruminants.

 

FS BIOENERGIA, Lucas do Rio Verde, Brazil – Henrique H. Ubrig has been named chief executive officer. Ubrig will direct the executive team.

 

BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM VETMEDICA INC., Duluth, Ga. – Kevin Miller has joined the equine team as senior territory manager for the Southwest region. Miller was previously with Henry Schein Animal Health.

 

MICHIGAN MILK PRODUCERS ASSN., Novi, Mich. – Ed Jaquay has joined the association as director of operations. Jaquay will be responsible for leading plant management at the three dairy processing facilities and overseeing the supply chain. He was previously with Proliant Dairy Ingredients.

Therese Tierney has been promoted to director of supply chain. Tierney will lead the management of comprehensive plant production planning models, oversee manufacturing schedules and develop action plans to resolve issues that affect supply. She was most recently supply chain manager.

 

PAULSEN, Sioux Falls, S.D. – Lorna Riemer has joined the agency as account coordinator. Riemer will work with account teams to provide day-to-day support functions, including project and budget coordination and industry research.

 

PAINE & PARTNERS LLC, San Mateo, Cal. – Adam Fless has joined the firm as managing director-portfolio performance. Fless will work with current portfolio companies to identify and execute on opportunities to strengthen operations and create value and ensure that new investments include robust operational diligence for improvement potential. He was previously with KKR Capstone.

 

KENT NUTRITION GROUP INC., Muscatine, Iowa – Aaron Houser has been promoted to quality control supervisor at the Hagerstown, Md., plant.

Derrick Sweigert has been promoted to plant manager at the Rockford, Ill., plant. Sweigert was most recently quality control supervisor.

 

BAYER, Whippany, N.J. – Dr. Carsten Brunn has been appointed president of the pharmaceuticals business in the Americas, including the U.S., Canada, Central and Latin America. Brunn was most recently head of the pharmaceuticals commercial operations in Japan.

 

BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM VETMEDICA INC., St. Joseph, Mo. – Dr. Steve Tousignant has joined the company as professional services veterinarian with the swine team. Tousignant will cover the Upper Midwest region of the U.S. He was previously with the Swine Center P.A.

 

J.D. HEISKELL HOLDINGS LLC, Elkhorn, Neb. – Rick Bowen has been named chief operating officer and executive vice president. Bowen will oversee the Elkhorn Trading Group and general managers of four regional operating groups in California, the Pacific Northwest, the southwestern U.S. and the Colorado front range. He was most recently general manager for the California Business Group.

 

ZINPRO CORP., Eden Prairie, Minn. – Satish Soni has joined the company as account manager-Central America and Caribbean. Soni will lead the operations and business activities throughout the region.

 

AMERICAN HUMANE, Washington, D.C. – Dr. Janet Helms has been appointed national director of the American Humane Farm Program. Helms was previously with Zoetis.

 

MARTIN ENERGY GROUP SERVICES LLC, Latham, Mo. – Andrew Bridgeman has joined the company as director of marketing and commercial development. Bridgeman will assist divisional managers in growth efforts and lead the marketing team.

 

LAND O’LAKES INC., Arden Hills, Minn. – Chris Roberts will join the company as executive vice president and chief operating officer, dairy foods, effective Feb. 6. Roberts was previously with Cargill.

 

CANADIAN BIO-SYSTEMS INC., Calgary, Alb. – Sabrina Zettell has joined the company as nutritionist. Zettell will assist customers in North American markets in utilizing the REP5 program for ruminant production. She will also help customers adopt nutritional solutions to support systems with reduced reliance on antimicrobials.

 

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION, McLean, Va. – Todd Batta has been named deputy director for congressional affairs. Batta will support congressional liaison activities. He was previously with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

 

VITA PLUS CORP., Madison, Wis. – Kari Herbrand has joined the company as formulation specialist. Herbrand will be responsible for handling and processing formulation requests and custom mixes for customers. She also will help update and maintain nutritional software databases for field staff.

 

BIG DUTCHMAN, Holland, Mich. – Carlos Lora has joined the Pig Business Unit as vice president of sales, Latin America.

 

ANIMAL AGRICULTURE ALLIANCE, Arlington, Va. – Hannah Thompson-Weeman has been promoted to vice president of communications. Thompson-Weeman will assume a greater management role over the communications outreach strategies as well as issues management initiatives and other program efforts. She was most recently director of communications.

 

COBANK, Denver, Colo. – Tom Halverson has been appointed chief executive officer. Halverson was most recently chief banking officer.

 

THUNDER SEED INC., Dilworth, Minn. – John Sorby has been named sales director. Sorby work with a team of district sales managers to help expand business throughout North Dakota, Minnesota and South Dakota. He was previously with Pinnacle Agriculture.

 

U.S. POULTRY & EGG ASSN., Tucker, Ga. – Stephen "Steve" Herring has been appointed controller. Herring will manage the financial operations, including investments, budget control, audits and purchasing. He will also be responsible for the development, continuing assessment, refinement and integrity of financial, informational technology and business practices and procedures.