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GROWMARK acquires propane terminal in New Hampton, Iowa

GROWMARK Growmark propane tanks

GROWMARK has acquired a propane terminal in New Hampton, Iowa, according to an announcement Jan. 4. The facility has 11 tanks with nearly 1 million gal. of total storage capacity. The terminal will be used primarily to serve area FS companies as well as other local retailers. GROWMARK will utilize the terminal in conjunction with its rail propane terminal in nearby Mason City, Iowa.

“We continue to look at opportunities and make necessary investments to ensure a reliable and competitive supply of propane to the Midwest,” said Kevin Carroll, GROWMARK vice president of energy and logistics. “This acquisition reinforces our commitment to being an excellent supplier of propane to the Midwest, and particularly northern Iowa. We continue to look for ways to best supply our members and other customers.”

Changes will be made to the existing facility to upgrade the loadout technology and add a transport unload station. It is expected to be fully operational later this winter.

GROWMARK, an agricultural cooperative with annual sales of $7 billion (fiscal 2016 data), provides agronomy, energy, facility planning and logistics products and services as well as grain marketing and risk management services in more than 40 states and Ontario. GROWMARK owns the FS trademark, which is used by affiliated member cooperatives.

Dairy calf respiratory disease comes with cold temperatures

EbertStudios_iStock_Thinkstock dairy calf lying in straw

Cold weather is not just hard on the people taking care of animals; it can be tough on the animals themselves, said Russ Daly, South Dakota State University extension veterinarian and South Dakota state public health veterinarian.

"It's not just our imagination that cold temperatures often bring with them an increase in sick calves; there are physiologic reasons why cold weather increases the risk of respiratory disease such as pneumonia in dairy calves," Daly said.

He explained that cold weather enhances the growth of certain respiratory microbes inside a calf's nose and upper respiratory tract. "The more bacteria present in the upper respiratory tract, the more likely they'll reach the lower lung and cause pneumonia," he said.

Daly added that cold weather also thickens mucus and impairs the work of the ciliary escalator — the fine, hair-like cell structures that sweep bacteria and foreign material from the lower airways up to the throat to be coughed up. "All these factors increase the risk of pneumonia in calves," he said.

Detection, prevention

Proper ventilation that provides fresh air to calf barns is important to preventing respiratory diseases — a goal that can conflict with efforts to protect calves from cold temperatures.

To ensure that calves are equipped to deal with cold temperatures, provide them with not just fresh air but also deep dry bedding and adequate nutrition, Daly said.

Early detection is key

Because of the increased risk of respiratory disease following cold weather, caretakers need to focus even more of their energy on calf health.

"Early detection and treatment is important to the calf's immediate health as well as to her long-term production," Daly said.

He pointed to evidence suggesting that dairy cows that were treated more than once for respiratory disease as calves produce 10% less milk in their first lactation and 15% less in their second lactation.

"These effects on milk production have not been demonstrated in calves only treated once, underlining the importance of effective and timely treatment," he said.

Heifers that suffered pneumonia as calves are older, on average, at first calving compared to heifers that did not get sick.

Antibiotic treatments

When prevention efforts fail, Daly said early detection and effective treatment of respiratory disease can improve the odds of a calf surviving respiratory disease as well as their productivity as a cow.

"Work with your veterinarian to improve these aspects of your operation, and pay close attention to calves when cold winter temperatures set in," he said.

Many medications — available by prescription through veterinarians — have demonstrated effectiveness against respiratory pathogens. Antibiotics labeled for use against Mannheimia, Histophilus and Pasteurella are the most effective in treating calf respiratory disease, he added.

"As there is not a single drug that has proved effective in every situation, antibiotic choice should be guided by veterinary consultation and, if available, bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity results from previous calves," Daly said.

Using nasal swabs to identify pathogens and guide treatment should be approached with caution but may provide important information in some cases. Lung cultures from calves that died of pneumonia may be more useful, but Daly said their representativeness for future calf groups should be considered carefully.

"Pneumonia and other infections caused by Mycoplasma bovis are particularly difficult to treat. Antibiotics labeled for mycoplasma should be utilized, and treatment length may need to be prolonged," he said.

Identifying mycoplasma through lab testing is a valuable piece of information that can help with treatment and prognosis.

Supportive care

Supportive care through anti-inflammatory medications, injectable vitamin supplements and oral electrolytes can also prove valuable in helping an ill calf deal with pneumonia.

During outbreaks, veterinarians may recommend an intranasal vaccine to enhance the immune response.

Providing sick calves with extra bedding and calf coats will help them maintain their body temperature.

Milk should not be withheld from sick calves, as they need energy and protein in order to respond to the infection. "Breaking the required daily feeding into smaller amounts given more frequently may help calves with lung problems 'catch their breath' more easily during feeding," Daly suggested.

Climate Corp. unveils most robust R&D pipeline in digital ag

The Climate Corp., a subsidiary of Monsanto Co., unveiled for the first time more than 35 projects in its research and development (R&D)  pipeline. The company also announced plans to expand its industry-leading Climate FieldView digital agriculture platform into new international geographies over the next few years.

“The digital ag industry continues to accelerate rapidly as more farmers experience the value data-driven digital tools can bring their operations,” said Mike Stern, chief executive officer of Climate Corp. “At Climate, constant innovation has been paramount to the delivery of our Climate FieldView platform that’s helping thousands of farmers unlock the value of their field data to enhance productivity. Our commitment to innovation is reflected in the breadth and depth of our R&D pipeline, and we will continue to expand the geographic availability of our tools to deliver new digital technologies to farmers across the globe.”

The science behind the company’s Climate FieldView platform leverages data from the soil, field and atmosphere to help farmers better understand field variability and customize their agronomic practices to get the most out of every acre.

“There’s a tremendous opportunity for farmers to maximize their yield potential by tailoring their management practices to address field variability,” said Sam Eathington, chief scientist for Climate Corp. “Farming at the zone level is the new reality. Climate is already delivering advanced seed scripting and zone-level nitrogen monitoring capabilities, and our robust research pipeline ensures we will continue to provide farmers actionable insights to help them operate more efficiently and sustainably while supporting all of the key decisions they have to make each year to optimize yield.”

Climate R&D pipeline highlights

Placing the right seed in the right location is critical to achieving optimal yield. Through the collection and analysis of millions of data points on seed product performance across many geographies, Climate said its seed product selection research is designed to help farmers select the most ideal seed products for their fields.

To help farmers efficiently manage fertility and maximize productivity, Climate is also working to develop variable rate prescription tools for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. With these tools, Climate expects to provide the industry’s first comprehensive fertility solution, delivering customized insights for crop nutrition and fertility management, tailored to farmers’ unique goals.

Climate’s field health R&D is focused on providing data that helps farmers see what’s happening in each field, prioritize in-season crop management, and use satellite imagery and other field data to make input decisions for the next season. Climate’s field health research includes a package of disease insights aimed at identifying and predicting disease vulnerability, as well as diagnosing key crop diseases using artificial intelligence capabilities. A first for the digital ag industry, Climate is also developing a new directed scouting tool to help farmers understand which fields to prioritize during scouting, helping them save time and protect their yield before it’s impacted at the end of the season.

In less than two growing seasons, the Climate FieldView platform has become the most broadly connected platform in the U.S. and has continued to expand into new global regions, including recent expansion into Canada and Brazil. In November 2016, Climate Corp. acquired VitalFields, a European farm management software company based in Tallinn, Estonia, marking the company’s first step into the European market. The company has plans to bring the Climate FieldView platform to Europe, South Africa, Australia and Argentina over the next few years.

Officially launched in 2015, the Climate FieldView platform is on more than 100 million acres across the U.S. and Brazil, with more than 100,000 U.S. farmers engaging in Climate's digital tools.

Smithfield Foods completes acquisition of Clougherty Packing

Smithfield Foods Inc. announced the completion of the acquisition of Clougherty Packing LLC, parent company of Farmer John and Saag's Specialty Meats brands, and the PFFJ LLC farm operations from Hormel Foods Corp. The closing followed the approval of the sale by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S.

"We are proud to officially welcome Farmer John to our growing Smithfield family — a move that has already created new value for our combined operations and set the stage for a strong 2017," said Kenneth Sullivan, president and chief executive officer of Smithfield Foods. "With this one acquisition, we've created a more efficient supply chain coast to coast and expanded our operations, product portfolio as well as our customer and consumer base."

Smithfield will welcome three farms located in Arizona, California and Wyoming into its hog production division. Kenneth Baptist, vice president of operations for Smithfield's packaged meats division, will now lead Farmer John operations, which includes both the Farmer John and Saag's Specialty Meats brands. Baptist has more than a decade of experience at Smithfield and more than 30 years of experience in the food industry.

The purchase price was $145 million in cash, adjusted for working capital. Farmer John harvests approximately 7,400 hogs per day, and in fiscal 2016, the businesses accounted for approximately $500 million in sales and earnings per share of approximately 3 cents.

Smithfield Foods nears 2017 sow group housing goal

Smithfield sow group housing

Smithfield Foods Inc. reported this week that as of Dec. 31, 2016, 87% of pregnant sows on company-owned farms have been transitioned to group housing systems, a 6% increase over 2015. As planned when Smithfield first announced its commitment in 2007, all company-owned farms in the U.S. are expected to be fully converted by 2017.

 

Today, the company said nearly nine out of every ten of our pregnant sows are living in group housing. The change has cost several hundred million dollars, and on many of the farms, the transition process led to additional construction work, equipment and system upgrades and the development of new feeding and watering systems.

 

“We are proud to have nearly completed our group housing transition – a process that we’ve remained dedicated to for nearly a decade,” said Stewart Leeth, vice president of regulatory affairs and chief sustainability officer for Smithfield Foods. “At each farm along the way, we’ve made changes that have benefited both our animals while positively impacting the efficiency and environmental sustainability of our farms.”

 

Smithfield

Smithfield

 

Beyond efforts at company-owned farms, Smithfield previously announced it expects all U.S. contract growers to transition to group housing by 2022.

 

“Contract sow growers who elect not to participate won’t be guaranteed contract extensions,” the company said on its website. “We are providing guidance and expertise to contract growers when requested to help them through the conversion process.”

 

Smithfield's hog production operations in Poland (AgriPlus) and Romania (Smithfield Ferme) fully converted to group housing facilities on company-owned farms several years ago. Smithfield’s other international hog operations, including company-owned farms in Mexico, are expected to convert to group housing by 2022.

 

"I am proud of the progress we have made toward this bold goal,” said Kenneth Sullivan, president and chief executive officer of Smithfield Foods. "It demonstrates our continued commitment to the care and well-being of our animals, our willingness and ability to lead the industry in this arena, and the far-reaching impact these pledges have on creating value for our business, particularly our hog production operations.”

 

Wayne Pacelle, president of the animal rights group Humane Society of the United States, welcomed the announcement, writing in a blog post that Smithfield “has made good on honoring its pledge from a decade ago.”

 

Pacelle added that contrary to claims from industry skeptics, “Smithfield reports that its transition has had no negative effects on its sows’ productivity.”

 

“But for all the progress, it’s important to note that while Smithfield is moving toward group housing, it’s still confining sows in cramped crates for several weeks at the beginning of their pregnancies,” he said, calling it “cruel” and “bad business.”

 

“Still, we welcome Smithfield’s progress, and encourage the company — and the rest of the pork industry — to continue what appears to be an inevitable movement away from immobilizing confinement of sentient creatures whose most basic biological and behavioral needs are frustrated by such systems,” Pacelle said.

Livestock & poultry cash market comparisons, 1/4/17

Livestock and meat ($)

Jan 4

Dec 28

6 mos. ago

Year ago

Steers, Choice, carcass, 550-700 lb., cwt., Omaha

203.65

201.84

209.08

228.03

Steers, Choice, 1,050-1,200 lb., cwt. southern Plains

118.0

115.50A

122.00

135.00

Feeder steers, 600-700 lb., cwt., Oklahoma City

N/A

N/A

N/A

177.75A

Lean hogs, carcass, Iowa-Minn. 167-187 lb.(1)

58.46

60.59

76.70

53.73

Feeder pigs, 40 lb. national direct delivered(2)

62.21

55.05

43.03

57.57

SEW pigs, 10 lb., national direct delivered (per head)

52.06

49.93

21.65

50.27

Choice beef, cutout, cwt.

201.52

203.47

210.05

230.59

Pork loin, 185 lb. 51-52% lean, cutout, cwt.(3)

80.75

77.85

85.39

74.79

Hog corn ratio

16.69

16.92

20.58

14.15

Steer corn ratio

36.42

37.91

33.02

37.71

Poultry and eggs (cents)

 

 

 

 

Chickens, Grade A, fresh lb. Chicago

82.17a

80.40a

88.35a

85.52a

Hen turkeys, Grade A, frozen, lb., Chicago

101.00A

N/A

118.00Aa

115.50Aa

Young tom turkeys, Grade A. frozen lb. Chicago

101.00A

N/A

126.50Aa

125.00Aa

Eggs, Grade A, large, doz., Chicago

112.50

132.50

78.50

94.50

N/A: not available.         A: average.

(1) Replaces live hogs; live hogs are 0.755 of quote.
(2) Replaces Sioux Falls, 50-60 lb. (2/26/07)
(3) National FOB plant, replaces national daily carlot.
Livestock, meat, poultry and egg prices from USDA.

Grain & ingredient cash market comparisons, 1/4/17

Major feed ingredients

Jan 4 Dec 28

6 mos. ago

Year ago

Corn No. 2, Chicago, bu.

 

 

 

 

Processor bid*

3.59A

3.45A

3.42A

3.64A

Terminal bid*

3.43A

3.27A

3.31A

3.43A

Milo, Kansas City, cwt.

5.42

5.05

5.66

6.30

Soybeans, Chicago, bu., processor bid

9.99A

9.97A

10.96A

8.68A

Soybean meal, 48% Decatur bid

322.10A

324.80A

389.90A

277.70A

Cottonseed meal, Memphis, ton

215.00

215.00

280.00

250.00

Canola meal, Minneapolis, ton

239.10

230.10

286.00

N/A

Linseed meal, solvent, Minneapolis

320.00

320.00

375.00

200.00

Meat and bone meal, Chicago, ton

273.00

238.00

403.00

220.00

Fish meal, menhaden, Atlanta, ton

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Corn gluten meal, 60%, Chicago, ton

525.00

523.00

600.00

470.00

Distillers dried grains, Chicago, ton

110.00

110.00

155.00

129.00

17% dehy. alfalfa pellets, Kansas City, ton

240.00

240.00

250.00

280.00

Millfeeds, midds, Minneapolis, ton

85.00

92.00

98.00

89.00

Molasses, cane, Houston, ton

130.00

130.00

140.00

142.50

Dried citrus pulp, Atlanta, ton

185.00

185.00

185.00

190.00

Whey, whole, Chicago, cwt.

39.00

38.90

25.00

21.37

Rolled oats, Minneapolis, ton

577.00

577.00

562.00

453.00

Barley, Los Angeles, cwt.

8.80

8.65

N/A

10.15

Feeding wheat, Kansas City, bu.

3.60

3.47

4.67

4.90

*Chicago corn and soybean prices for latest and previous week are the middle of the range of to-arrive bids; soybean meal prices are midrange of processor quotes. Chicago corn and soybean prices provided by USDA Market News. Six months, year ago comparisons are all spot cash. Based on prices reported by Feedstuffs' market reporters.

A: average

N/A: not available

Ingredient market prices, 1/4/17

The following prices, which include delivery, were obtained Jan. 4 from feed and grain vendors in the U.S. and Canada. The prices represent current trading values but are not guaranteed. Second column shows the amount of change since the previous week. Prices of certain products can vary depending on the processing method used. U.S. short tons, 2,000 lb. N-Nominal. N/A-Price not available.

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(Use password 2017)

 

OILSEED PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Soybean meal

 

 

(high-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

377.00

-

Boston

346.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

324.00

-3.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

387.00

-

Ft. Worth

350.00

-2.00

Kansas City

290.00

20.00

Los Angeles

343.00

-5.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

290.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

377.00

-

Portland

348.15

-0.75

San Francisco

343.00

-5.00

Twin Falls

360.00

-

Soybean meal

 

 

(low-protein)

 

 

Atlanta

367.00

-

Boston

341.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

312.00

-3.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

377.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

290.00

20.00

Los Angeles

324.00

-4.00

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Okeechobee

367.00

-

Portland

N/A

-

San Francisco

324.00

-4.00

Soybean hulls

 

 

Atlanta

200.00

-

Buffalo*

N/A

-

Chicago

140.00

10.00

Fayetteville, NC

220.00

-

Ft. Worth*

105.00

-

Los Angeles

157.00

9.00

Minneapolis

100.00

-

Okeechobee

200.00

-

San Francisco

157.00

9.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

* unpelleted

 

 

Whole cottonseed

 

 

Atlanta

200.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

235.00

2.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

200.00

-

Ft. Worth

240.00

-

Los Angeles

303.00

-5.00

Lubbock

205.00

-

Memphis

200.00

-

Okeechobee

217.00

-

Portland

330.00

-

San Francisco

303.00

-5.00

Twin Falls

305.00

-

Cottonseed meal

 

 

Atlanta

325.00

-

Chicago

258.00

-

Delmarva

325.00

-

Fayetteville NC

325.00

-

Ft. Worth

275.00

-

Kansas City

270.00

-20.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

245.00

-

Memphis

215.00

-

Okeechobee

335.00

-

San Francisco

231.00

3.00

Cottonseed hulls

 

 

Atlanta

325.00

-

Chicago

165.00

-10.00

Fayetteville NC

325.00

-

Ft. Worth

115.00

-

Okeechobee

362.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Lubbock

80.00

-

San Francisco

208.00

-7.00

Canola meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

239.10

9.00

Los Angeles

257.00

22.00

Montreal

253.00

5.00

Portland

246.65

7.25

San Francisco

257.00

22.00

Twin Falls

240.00

-

Vancouver

200.00

-

Sunflower seed meal

 

 

Fargo

150.00

-

Minneapolis

155.00

5.00

Linseed  meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Chicago

345.00

-

Fargo

270.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

306.00

-

Kansas City

240.00

5.00

Minneapolis

320.00

-

Safflower meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

138.00

-

ANIMAL BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

273.00

35.00

Delmarva

345.00

-

Fayetteville NC

300.00

20.00

Ft. Worth

240.00

-

Kansas City

220.00

20.00

Los Angeles

260.00

-

Memphis

290.00

20.00

Minneapolis

260.00

-

Portland

245.00

-

San Francisco

260.00

-

Meat and bone meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

340.00

10.00

Los Angeles

300.40

-

Memphis

330.00

10.00

Minneapolis

300.00

5.00

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(ruminant)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

900.00

-

Los Angeles

950.00

-

Memphis

875.00

-

Minneapolis

900.00

-

Flash-dried blood meal

 

 

(porcine)

 

 

Fayetteville NC

925.00

-

Memphis

900.00

-

Minneapolis

975.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

300.00

-

Ft. Worth

230.00

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Los Angeles

369.00

-

Memphis

300.00

-

Poultry byproduct meal

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

650.00

-

Fayetteville NC

650.00

-

Hydrolized feather meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Delmarva

405.00

15.00

Fayetteville NC

370.00

10.00

Ft. Worth

440.00

-

Kansas City

455.00

-15.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

370.00

10.00

Minneapolis

425.00

-

Menhaden fish meal

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

1450.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Memphis

1350.00

-

Minneapolis

1525.00

-10.00

Twin Falls

N/A

-

Blended tuna meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Anchovy  meal

 

 

Los Angeles

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

ANIMAL FAT, GREASE

 

 

(cents per pound)

 

 

Prime Tallow

 

 

Chicago

28.00

-0.50

Ft. Worth

N/A

-0.50

Los Angeles

22.75

-1.63

San Francisco

23.38

-

Yellow grease

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

22.00

-2.00

Delmarva

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

24.00

-

Ft. Worth

24.50

-1.00

Kansas City

25.50

-

Los Angeles

21.08

-2.30

Memphis

24.00

-

Minneapolis

22.00

-

San Francisco

22.38

-

Choice white grease

 

 

Chicago

27.00

-

Minneapolis

25.50

-0.50

Bleachable fancy tallow

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

30.00

1.00

Ft. Worth

31.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

30.00

-0.50

San Francisco

N/A

-

Vegetable-animal blend

 

 

Ft. Worth

25.00

-1.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

23.50

0.50

San Francisco

N/A

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(feed grade)

 

 

Delmarva

23.50

1.00

Fayetteville NC

23.00

-

Memphis

23.00

-

Poultry grease

 

 

(pet food grade)

 

 

Memphis

30.00

-

Fayetteville NC

30.00

-

GLUTEN, HOMINY

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Corn gluten meal

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

525.00

2.00

Kansas City

555.00

-

Los Angeles

550.00

-

Corn gluten feed

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

106.00

-

Fayetteville NC

130.00

-

Kansas City

150.00

-10.00

Okeechobee

150.00

-

Twin Falls

178.00

-

Wahpeton

N/A

-

Hominy feed

 

 

Atlanta

205.00

-

Boston

144.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

103.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

105.00

-

Los Angeles

162.00

-2.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

San Francisco

162.00

-2.00

Twin Falls

167.00

-

BREWERS, DISTILLERS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Brewers dried grains

 

 

Chicago

N/A

-

Kansas City

N/A

-

Malt Sprouts

 

 

Chicago

120.00

-

Milwaukee

95.00

-

Winona, Minn

95.00

-

Distillers dried grains

 

 

Atlanta

178.00

-

Boston

158.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

110.00

-

Fayetteville NC

178.00

-

Kansas City

150.00

-

Los Angeles

165.00

-

Minneapolis

95.00

-

Okeechobee

188.00

-

Portland

166.00

-0.50

San Francisco

162.00

-3.00

Twin Falls

175.00

-

Brewers yeast

 

 

(dollars per pound, sacked)

 

 

Chicago

0.75

-

Milwaukee

0.75

-

Minneapolis

0.75

-

ALFALFA

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Dehydrated pellets

 

 

(17% protein)

 

 

Central Neb.

235.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

310.00

-

Kansas City

240.00

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

245.00

-

Toledo

315.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Suncured pellets

 

 

(15% protein)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

180.00

-

Kansas City

180.00

-10.00

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Portland

200.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

WHEAT MILLFEEDS

 

 

Shorts

 

 

Chicago

95.00

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

137.00

-1.00

Millrun

 

 

Los Angeles

128.00

-1.00

Portland

140.00

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

115.00

-

Bran

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

120.00

5.00

Los Angeles

132.00

-2.00

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Middlings

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

95.00

10.00

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

155.00

-5.00

Kansas City

100.00

-

Los Angeles

135.00

-1.00

Memphis

162.00

-3.00

Minneapolis

85.00

-7.00

Okeechobee

N/A

-

DAIRY BYPRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per hundredweight)

 

 

Dried skim milk

 

 

Ft. Worth

100.00

-

Minneapolis

100.00

-

Dried buttermilk

 

 

Ft. Worth

98.00

2.00

Minneapolis

98.00

2.00

Whole whey

 

 

Chicago

39.00

0.10

Ft. Worth

41.00

2.00

Kansas City

27.50

-

Minneapolis

41.00

2.00

Whey protein concentrate

 

 

Ft. Worth

91.63

3.38

Milwaukee

91.63

3.38

Lactose

 

 

Ft. Worth

37.00

-

Minneapolis

37.00

-

OATS, RICE PRODUCTS

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Rolled oats

 

 

Chicago

410.00

-

Kansas City

350.00

5.00

Minneapolis

577.00

-

Crimped oats

 

 

Chicago

380.00

-

Kansas City

285.00

5.00

Minneapolis

417.00

-

Pulverized oats

 

 

Chicago

120.00

-

Minneapolis

138.00

-

Reground oat feed

 

 

Chicago

60.00

-

Kansas City

30.00

-

Minneapolis

72.00

-

Oats

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Minneapolis

2.83

-

Portland*

210.00

-

(*per ton)

 

 

Rice bran

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

150.00

-

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

130.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

San Francisco

114.00

-6.00

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice millfeeds

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

95.00

-

Freeport

N/A

-

Kansas City

106.00

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Stuttgart, Ark.

N/A

-

Rice hulls

 

 

Ft. Worth

60.00

-

Kansas City

60.00

-

DRIED PULP

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Citrus pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

185.00

-

Fayetteville NC

195.00

-

Okeechobee

160.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

*(sold wet)

 

 

Beet pulp pellets

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Boise

N/A

-

Chicago

150.00

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Kansas City

440.00

-

Minneapolis

120.00

-

Portland

156.00

1.00

Saginaw

140.00

-

Beet pulp shreds

 

 

Mpls (sacked)

355.00

-

Los Angeles*

N/A

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

Twin Falls

N/A

-

*bulk, wet

 

 

GRAINS

 

 

Barley feed

 

 

Kansas City (bu.)

4.45

0.05

Los Angeles (cwt)

8.80

0.15

Portland (ton)

160.00

-

San Francisco (cwt)

8.80

0.15

Feed wheat

 

 

Atlanta (bu.)

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC (bu.)

N/A

-

Kansas City (bu)

3.60

0.13

Los Angeles (cwt)

N/A

-

San Francisco (cwt)

N/A

-

Corn

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

5.17

-

Boston

3.54

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Chicago

3.68

0.07

Delmarva

3.82

0.12

Fayetteville NC

5.17

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Kansas City

3.47

0.14

Los Angeles*

8.76

0.04

San Fran (rail)*

8.76

0.04

San Fran (truck)*

N/A

-

Memphis

3.80

0.17

Minneapolis

2.98

-

Okeechobee

5.40

-

Portland (per ton)

164.50

2.00

(*per cwt)

 

 

Milo

 

 

(dollars per bushel)

 

 

Atlanta

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

3.91

0.73

Kansas City

3.04

0.21

Los Angeles*

8.22

0.01

Memphis

N/A

-

*(per cwt.)

 

 

Ground grain screenings

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Ft. Worth

430.00

2.00

Kansas City

50.00

-

OTHER

 

 

(dollars per ton)

 

 

Almond hulls

 

 

Los Angeles

95.00

-

San Francisco

73.00

-

Bakery feed

 

 

Atlanta

165.00

-

Buffalo

N/A

-

Fayetteville NC

170.00

-

Memphis

160.00

-

Minneapolis

157.00

5.00

Feed urea

 

 

Buffalo

N/A

-

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Minneapolis

N/A

-

Salt

 

 

Kansas City

58.00

-

Los Angeles

50.00

-

Cane molasses

 

 

Ft. Worth

N/A

-

Houston

130.00

-

Kansas City

167.50

-

Los Angeles

N/A

-

Memphis

N/A

-

Minneapolis

177.50

-

New Orleans

132.50

-

San Francisco

N/A

-

INSIDE WASHINGTON: Trump’s USTR pick is strong trade enforcer

Capitol Washington DC

President-elect Trump’s transition announced that Robert Lighthizer will serve as U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) in the new administration. Lighthizer has had a long and distinguished career in trade, working in the White House, Senate and private sector to assure favorable trading conditions for American goods and services. Lighthizer was deputy USTR in the Reagan administration and has led the international trade law practice at Skadden, Arps Slate, Meagher.

Lighthizer will join Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Peter Navarro (who will chair the new National Trade Council), and Trump’s special representative for international trade Jason Greenblatt, as key trade officials in the incoming administration.

When serving as deputy United States Trade Representative, Lighthizer played a major role in developing trade policy for the Reagan Administration and negotiating roughly two dozen bilateral international agreements on a variety of topics from steel to grain. “These agreements were uniformly tough and frequently resulted in significant reductions in the shipment of unfairly traded imports into the United States,” the Trump Transition team said in a statement.

The New York Times shared that although Reagan is often remembered as an advocate for free trade, in the early days of his administration he also imposed a quota on Japanese auto imports. “It was the first in a long series of measures aimed at putting pressure on the nation that was then regarded, like China in recent years, as a threat to American prosperity.”

Many of Trump’s trade advisers, including Lighthizer, share the view that the United States in recent decades “prioritized the ideal of free trade over its own self-interest.”

Agricultural groups are also hopeful he can work on behalf of farmers to advance U.S. ag exports.

“America’s farmers and ranchers know unfair regulations, steep tariffs and senseless non-tariff barriers undermine our exports. We must work together to remove these obstacles to prosperity and identify new global opportunities that will benefit American agriculture,” said American Farm Bureau Federation president Zippy Duvall.

“Economic growth in rural America depends on maintaining and increasing access to markets outside the United States. Since more than 95% of the world’s population lives outside our borders, expanding access to international markets is essential for our future success. We trust Mr. Lighthizer will work tirelessly to assure it,” Duvall added.

A joint statement from Jim Mulhern, president and CEO of National Milk Producers Federation , and Matt McKnight, senior vice president of market access, regulatory and industry affairs for U.S. Dairy Export Council, said his experiences at USTR and chief of staff for the Senate Finance Committee and his direct private sector engagement in enforcing trade rules will “serve him well in forging a path forward on trade policy that will benefit this country.”

The dairy groups noted that the U.S. dairy industry has seen the good and bad from trade agreements. “Our NAFTA partners epitomize both sides of that story: Our dairy agreement with Mexico has created an export market worth well over $1 billion a year, while on the other side of the border Canada has at every opportunity decided to flout its dairy trade commitments to the U.S.,” Mulhern and McKnight said.

“A focus on preserving and growing what is working well, while cracking down further on what is not, will help to expand global markets for U.S. dairy farmers and the companies that turn their milk into nutritious dairy products shipped all over the world. Given that every $1 billion in U.S. dairy exports translates into over 23,000 jobs in the dairy sector and related industries, expanding dairy sales abroad is a strong job-creation strategy,” the two added.

Another strong trade advocate will be in the arena soon on behalf of U.S. dairy producers. Reports indicated this week that Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack plans to take over the president and CEO position at USDEC once Trump takes office later this month.  Tom Suber retired at the end of the year as president of the organization after holding the role for the past 21 years.

And as for Trump’s agriculture secretary? The official word has not been made. Many reports point to former Gov. Sonny Perdue as the front-runner. Other reports had surfaced that former California Lt. Gov Abel Maldonado was also in the mix. He is a Mexican-American and has a farming background as he grew up picking crops with his parents who were agricultural workers themselves.

Urbanization claims 186,000 sq. miles of fertile cropland

shutterstock barn and grain bins near field edge

A team of researchers from institutions around the world, including the University of Maryland, determined that by 2030, expanding urban areas worldwide will swallow up fertile cropland equal to nearly twice the size of Florida, adding pressure to an already strained global food system.

The researchers estimated that the area of land that stands to be lost through urbanization — more than 186,000 square miles, or nearly 300,000 sq. km — could produce enough food to provide 300 million people with 2,500 calories a day for an entire year.

Associate professor Giovanni Baiocchi from the University of Maryland’s department of geographical sciences contributed to the study led by the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons & Climate Change (MCC), which is located in Berlin, Germany.

“We are witnessing an unprecedented transition from predominantly rural to urban lifestyles,” Baiocci said. “Rapid and unplanned urban growth is further threatening sustainable development. As rapidly urbanizing regions of the global south are increasing their dependence on food imports, millions of people in poverty are becoming more vulnerable to world food market volatility, potentially exacerbating the problem of global income inequality.”

Results from the study, “Future Urban Land Expansion & Implications for Global Croplands,” were recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

According to the study, global urbanization will take place on agricultural land that is almost twice as fertile as the world average, and the effects will be particularly severe in parts of Asia and Africa.

“Hot spots of cropland loss tend to be river valleys and deltas, such as the Yangtze River Delta near Shanghai or the Pearl River Delta near Hong Kong. On a regional level, that food production loss cannot always be compensated for. This, in turn, could have an impact on the world food system,” said lead author Christopher Bren d’Amour with MCC. The study also shows that the land use conflict between urbanization and food production can differ markedly from one global region to the next. “A lot depends on the urbanization dynamics of the individual countries. In India, for example, the urbanization process is not as fast as in China and smaller in overall scale. This is reflected in our results, which predict significantly lower cropland losses for India.”

The scientists used spatially explicit urban area expansion projections developed by Yale University to conduct their research. They then combined these with land use data from the University of Minnesota and the University of British Columbia on global croplands and crop yields. The MCC study examined the total loss of croplands worldwide. To determine the productivity of that land, the researchers used the aggregated production of the 16 most important food crops, including corn, rice, soybeans and wheat.

The researchers estimated that China alone will have to bear one-fourth of total global cropland loss, amounting to nearly 80,000 sq. km. Meanwhile, the challenge to African countries already greatly affected by hunger and food shortages — such as Nigeria, Burundi and Rwanda — is compounded by two factors: the distinct vulnerability of many African countries to the effects of climate change, and the comparatively greater difficulties encountered by the unemployed rural population to gain a foothold in the urban labor markets.

The study found that urbanization in Egypt is also particularly pronounced and that the country could lose about one-third of its cropland by 2030.

“Policy-makers at the municipal level are now called on to take action. Their time has come, since urban planning is now part and parcel of world policy,” said Felix Creutzig, one of the study’s lead authors and head of the MCC Working Group on Land Use, Infrastructure & Transport. “Urban planners can contribute to preventing small farmers from losing their livelihoods. Spatially efficient urbanization could help to retain the existing agricultural system while continuing to provide small farmers with access to the urban food market.”