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FDA approves two key cattle medications for use together

Tyler Olson/Hemera/Thinkstock cattle at feed bunk
Cattle producers can now combine Pennchlor and Rumensin in rations.

For years, cattle producers have been looking for the benefits of therapeutic applications of chlortetracycline combined with the coccidiosis control and performance results of Rumensin for receiving/starter rations. Until now, they’ve had to choose one or the other. In late July, the Food and Drug Administration approved the combination use of Pennchlor (chlortetracycline Type A medicated article) and Rumensin (monensin Type A medicated article) in beef calves two months of age and older, and growing beef steers and heifers fed in confinement for slaughter. At a time when input costs, including feed, are at an all-time high, the ability to use these products in combination gives producers more options to improve the sustainability and efficiency of their business.

“We are very excited about the opportunity and flexibility this new combination claim provides feedlot operators and cattle producers,” said Ed Seed, vice president of global sales and marketing at Pharmgate Animal Health. “We’ve been working over the past month to make the updated labeling and Veterinary Feed Directive forms available to the cattle feed and veterinary industry and are now working collaboratively to roll this out more broadly.”

Dr. Sara Linneen, Elanco beef nutrition technical consultant, commented, “This combination approval of Rumensin and Pennchlor gives producers options for their receiving program to optimize productivity.”

 

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