Wild salmon get help above river dams

Salmon trucking success could open miles of historical spawning habitat.

For the past several years, technicians have been trucking spring Chinook salmon to above the Foster Dam in Sweet Home, Ore., to see if the salmon would spawn and if their offspring could survive the passage over the dam and subsequent ocean migration to eventually return as adults some three to five years later.

A new study examining the genetic origin of adult spring Chinook returning to Foster Dam offers definitive proof that the offspring survived, potentially opening up miles

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