USDA launches food group nutrition quizzes

Quizzes encourage healthy food and beverage choices.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Center for Nutrition Policy & Promotion (CNPP) – the group that created MyPlate – just released a set of quizzes on the five food groups. The quizzes, designed to challenge teach, and even entertain, are intended for anyone – adults and kids alike – who wants to learn about the food groups or wants a refresher.

USDA’s food groups have been around for about 75 years. Although the current names of the food groups – fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods and dairy – have changed slightly over time, the food groups were key components of MyPyramid (2005), the Food Guide Pyramid (1992), Food Wheel (1984), Hassle-Free Daily Food Guide (1979), Basic Four (1956) and Basic Seven (1940).

“Food groups make it easier to learn about nutrition and plan healthy meals,” CNPP nutritionist David Herring noted. “Each food group provides specific nutrients that our bodies need, so instead of trying to track dozens of nutrients, you can just focus on getting the five groups.”

Like MyPlate and the ChooseMyPlate.gov website, Herring said the new quizzes encourage people to make healthy food and beverage choices from all five food groups.

The quizzes will test knowledge not just about what foods are in each group (e.g., "Where do tomatoes go, anyway?") but also about the nutrition, health and other benefits of each of the food groups (e.g., "What beneficial nutrients are in whole grains that aren’t in refined grains?").

“For all of us, eating healthy is a journey shaped by many factors, including our stage of life, situations, preferences, access to food, culture, traditions and the personal decisions we make over time,” Herring said. “It’s important to remember that all food and beverage choices count. The new MyPlate quizzes are another tool to use to help move yourself – or others – in the right direction.”

To test your knowledge of the five food groups, visit www.choosemyplate.gov/quiz.

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