New analysis explores geographical origins of flu

Surveillance for developing new vaccines should focus on regions where population size, dynamics can increase transmission rates of flu strains.

A computer model developed by scientists at the University of Chicago shows that small increases in transmission rates of the seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2) can lead to rapid evolution of new strains that spread globally through human populations.

The results of this analysis, published Sept. 13 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, reinforce the idea that surveillance for developing new, seasonal vaccines should be focused on areas of east, south and southeast Asi

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