Domino's announces $1M commitment to FFA

Scholarships, grants and other programs to be funded for students interested in agriculture.

Domino's Pizza announced this week that is supporting students interested in a future in agriculture by making a commitment to donate $1 million over five years to the National FFA Organization.

"There is no Domino's without the dairy, tomato, wheat and other farmers across the United States working hard every day to produce the food we serve. We want to do something other than say we support the farming community, we want to make a commitment to an organization that is making a difference," said Tim McIntyre, Domino's executive vice president of communication and investor relations. "A commitment to FFA is a commitment to supporting the future of agriculture."

The five-year commitment will begin in 2017. Each year, the gift will help fund collegiate scholarships to students aspiring to further their education after high school, as well as grants for supervised agriculture experiences. Supervised agriculture experiences are for students in grades 7-11, who demonstrate financial need, and are planning activities outside of class to gain hands-on experience and develop skills in agriculturally-related areas.  The gift will also assist agriculture literacy and advocacy programs, and FFA's Living to Serve platform that supports hunger and environmental initiatives in local communities and states.

"Building a relationship with Domino's is very important to FFA, and we sincerely appreciate their generous financial support," said Mark Poeschl, chief executive officer of the National FFA Organization and Foundation. "When such a prominent and widely recognized national consumer brand recognizes the producers and suppliers of their food ingredients, agricultural educators and FFA members are inspired to initiate a dialogue with consumers about where their food is produced.  In that way, Domino's contributions help FFA achieve our vision of growing leaders, building communities and strengthening agriculture."

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