bee flying Serg Velusceac/iStock/Thinkstock

To save honeybees, human behavior must change

Poor management practices have enabled spread of bee pathogens, researcher argues.

In the search for answers to the complex health problems and colony losses experienced by honeybees in recent years, it may be time for professionals and hobbyists in the beekeeping industry to look in the mirror.

In a research essay to be published in the Entomological Society of America's Journal of Economic Entomology, Robert Owen argues that human activity is a key driver in the spread of pathogens that afflict the European honeybee (Apis mellifera) — the s

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