Honeybees treated with a common antibiotic (pink dots) were half as likely to survive the week after treatment compared with a group of untreated bees (green dots). Vivian Abagiu
Honeybees treated with a common antibiotic (pink dots) were half as likely to survive the week after treatment compared with a group of untreated bees (green dots).

Overuse of antibiotics brings risks for bees

Bees had dramatically fewer naturally occurring gut microbes after tetracycline treatment, allowing harmful pathogen to gain foothold.

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) have found that honeybees treated with a common antibiotic were half as likely to survive the week after treatment than a group of untreated bees — a finding that may have health implications for bees and people alike.

The scientists found that the antibiotics cleared out beneficial gut bacteria in the bees, making way for a harmful pathogen to get a foothold. The research is the latest discovery to indicate that ove

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