Poultry research at Auburn University is focusing on improving the quality of breast meat through the use of an easy-to-use and reliable hand-held device. Auburn University.
Poultry research at Auburn University is focusing on improving the quality of breast meat through the use of an easy-to-use and reliable hand-held device.

Meeting consumer demand for quality poultry meat

Commercially available, handheld bioelectric impedance analysis technology can distinguish severe woody breast from normal breast fillets.

An Auburn University researcher is developing a process to rapidly detect poor meat quality in chicken breasts, which could mean the end of biting into a fast-food chicken sandwich only to find that the meat is tough and chewy.

Amit Morey, assistant professor in the College of Agriculture’s department of poultry science, is one of seven Auburn researchers recently awarded LAUNCH Innovation Grants designed to help move their novel research from the lab to the marketplace, with a

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TAGS: Poultry
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