ARS molecular biologist Geoff Walbieser (left) and geneticist Brian Bosworth inspect a Delta Select channel catfish. ARS Photo by Danny Oberle.
ARS molecular biologist Geoff Walbieser (left) and geneticist Brian Bosworth inspect a Delta Select channel catfish.

Catfish genome helps improve catfish products

Channel catfish genome will provide new ways of identifying and breeding fish with improved traits, such as growth rate, fillet yield, meat quality and disease resistance.

A fish called "Coco" is lending a fin and much-needed DNA to U.S. Department of Agriculture and Auburn University researchers as part of the first sequencing of a channel catfish genome, which promises better products for catfish producers.

Among the more than 2,500 known catfish species, the channel catfish accounts for more than 60% of fish and seafood production. Information gleaned from Coco's genome sets the stage for new ways of identifying and breeding channel catfish with impr

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