A soil test is just one step in determining the risk of added phosphorus. Knowing how likely the phosphorus is to enter into waterways is also important. Credit: Q.M. Ketterings.
A soil test is just one step in determining the risk of added phosphorus. Knowing how likely the phosphorus is to enter into waterways is also important.

Better way to manage phosphorus developed

Improvements in science bring about improved index.

All living things — from bacteria and fungi to plants and animals — need phosphorus. However, extra phosphorus in the wrong place can harm the environment. For example, when too much phosphorus enters a lake or stream, it can lead to excessive weed growth and algal blooms, and low-oxygen dead zones can form.

Runoff from agricultural sites can be an important source of phosphorus pollution. To help evaluate and reduce this risk, the U.S. Department of Agriculture first prop

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