microscope science

University of Surrey to tackle 'One Health' issues of zoonoses, AMR

Training next generation of scientists a key component of program.

The University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine in the U.K. has been awarded up to 2 million euros from the European Commission to help revolutionize medical, veterinary and environmental health research across Europe.

During the "groundbreaking" study, academics from the University of Surrey will undertake interdisciplinary research to tackle the growing threat of foodborne zoonoses — infectious diseases transmitted from animals to humans — to the population’s health and the rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

This award is part of a landmark, 90 million-euro pan-European project among 41 veterinary and medical laboratories and is an example of the "One Health" concept that recognizes that human health is interconnected with the health and welfare of animals and the environment.

Training the next generation of scientists is a key component of the program, and the University of Surrey will be taking the lead in this area.

Professor Roberto La Ragione, head of pathology and infectious diseases at the Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine, said, “Recent zoonotic outbreaks such as avian influenza and the emergence of antibiotic resistance are perfect examples of why this research is urgently required.

“Transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans poses a significant threat to public health across the world, and it is important that we act now to avoid its devastating effects,” La Ragione added.

Dr. Dan Horton, veterinary virology lecturer, said, “This program will create a research community across Europe with medical, veterinary and environmental health scientists working together. Such an interdisciplinary and international approach is essential to address the threats of zoonotic disease and antimicrobial resistance."

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