Dye is poured into a subsurface well to trace the movement of water during snowmelt. Although the dye barely seems noticeable, its footprint will be visible during lab analysis. Credit: Halya Petzold
Dye is poured into a subsurface well to trace the movement of water during snowmelt. Although the dye barely seems noticeable, its footprint will be visible during lab analysis.

Calculating 'old' vs. 'new' water runoff

How water moves over, through and around soil particles, organic matter, pores, microbes and roots matters.

Just ahead of a rainstorm, Cody Ross might run out to an agricultural research site to get some dye into an injection well as part of his graduate work at the University of Manitoba. The point is to evaluate the path water follows from the field during and after the rainstorm.

Ross, a member of the Watershed Systems Research Program at the University of Manitoba, is measuring water flow in a part of the soil called the vadose zone, the saturated level of soil right under the surface.

All access premium subscription

This content requires a subscription to Feedstuffs in order to access. If you are a paid subscriber, use your email and password to Log In now.


Current Feedstuffs Subscribers: Online and mobile access are now included at no charge to you. To read this article, use your subscriber email and password to log-in to your account (or contact us for assistance in updating your account.)


Not Currently a Subscriber: Subscribe NOW to Feedstuffs and receive our print and/or digital publications, enewsletters and premium online content. Visit Feedstuffs.com and click on Subscribe at the top of the page for more information.


SUBSCRIBE NOW https://circulation.feedstuffs.com/Publications.aspx


TO RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION https://circulation.feedstuffs.com/SubscriptionOffers.aspx


Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish